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A cautionary tale after HS athlete death admin 06/24/2022 5:56 PM
WSAZ in West Virginia calls for changes in State laws regarding AEDs informed by the death of a high school athlete.


https://www.wymt.com/2022/06/23/wsaz-investigates-student-athlete-safety/


WSAZ Investigates | Student Athlete Safety
By Joseph Payton

Published: Jun. 23, 2022 at 3:43 PM PDT


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) - An underlying heart condition can become fatal on the field or court in seconds. So, how do you catch potential issues before the unthinkable happens? During the last few decades, medical professionals have learned a lot about heart health and what could lead to a catastrophic incident. Life-saving technology is also more readily available now than ever before.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t help those who have already passed away. Players and coaches on the 1997 South Gallia High School baseball team were changed forever after losing a teammate to sudden cardiac arrest. Jack James was the head coach of the Rebels back then and remembers April 2, 1997, all too well.

James fought back tears recalling the death of Patrick Lawrence, who died after a ball struck him in the chest during a game that day.

“He was on second base, and there was a wild pitch,” said James, who was standing in the coaches boxes near third base.

The ball got by the catcher and Lawrence started running toward third base. The catcher threw the ball to the third basemen, but the throw was off target.

“Patrick started to slide and the ball hit him right in the chest,” said James. “He popped up! I turned to him and said, ‘Patrick, are you OK?’ He said, ‘Coach I’m OK!”

James recalls briefly turning to speak to another player before turning back around to speak to Lawrence.

“Next thing I know, I turn around and he’s on the ground,” James said.

Lawrence was taken to a nearby hospital where he was pronounced dead. It was a moment that changed the lives of Lawrence’s family and this teammates on that baseball team. Matthew Bess, one of his teammates, considered Lawrence a great friend. He remembers the moment Coach James addressed the team later that evening.

“He just told us that we had lost him and I’m just like, ‘what do you mean?’ At that age, you can’t process what that means,” Bess said.

Lawrence was only 16 years old when he died. Now, more than 25 years later, Bess still wonders what could have been done to prevent his teammate’s death. Sports medicine physician Dr. Andy Gilliland says keeping athletes safe and preventing sudden cardiac arrest starts with being prepared for the worst.

“Preparation is key to all of those catastrophic incidents. You can’t do much to prevent a ligament injury. But on the scale of things, those aren’t catastrophic,” said Dr. Gilliland.

When scheduling your child for their annual sports physical, there are a few things you can do to ensure a thorough exam. The first thing you can do is choose the right medical professional. A family care physician or pediatrician who already knows your child is best. A specialist in sports medicine will know what things to look and listen for.

The second thing you can do is make sure you know your family’s health history and share it with your doctor.

“If you have a family history or somebody who is a primary relative like a brother, sister, mother, or father who has a history of sudden cardiac arrest death. If you have a mom that has passed away due to unfortunate circumstances in her 30s, that individual probably needs to be screened a bit more beyond just listening to the heart during a physical exam,” said Dr. Gilliland.

The third thing you can do is fill out the health history forms accurately.

“The most important part of the physical is not the exam, but the history party. The history questionnaire catches a multitude of things, not just cardiac related. It is excruciatingly important to make sure parents fill it out and to make sure they read the questions because our ability to give a kid the ‘green light’ is predicated on that accurate history,” said Dr. Gilliland.

WSAZ looked into just how detail those forms are in each state and what questions are being asked.

The questionnaire part of the Ohio High School Athletic Association (OHSAA) and the Kentucky High School Athletic Association (KHSAA) physical forms are mirror images. Both include the same 10 questions that the American Heart Association has established as the standard of care. The West Virginia Secondary School Activities Commission (WVSSAC) has its own questionnaire with similar, but fewer questions that address the heart.

WSAZ asked the WVSSAC Executive Director if they intend to adopt those same questions and include them in pre-participation physical forms.

“We are looking to revamp our physical form. It is certainly on the schedule. The national physical form for pre-participation is going under some adoption right now too, so, we’ll kind of wait and see what they do,” said Executive Director Bernie Dolan.

West Virginia does have a stronger requirement than Ohio and Kentucky when it comes to having life-saving equipment readily available. West Virginia state law says that an AED must be present for all high school games and practices. An AED is a device that can be used to quickly shock someone’s heart back into regular rhythm. Many schools keep an AED inside the school building near the gymnasium. This ensures that most indoor sports have an AED that is easily accessible. For many outdoor sports that are played away from the school building, it is the responsibility of the coaching staff and athletic trainers to make sure an AED is present and nearby.

Unlike West Virginia, there are no state laws in Kentucky or Ohio that require AEDs be present at sporting events. The devices are only recommended by the athletic associations.

“If we make a health and safety recommendation and a school district decides not to do it, they are taking on a tremendous amount of liability. Once we recommend it, it is pretty well done. We’ve settled on an NATA recommendation that you should have an AED,” said Julian Tackett with the KHSAA. “If we make a health and safety recommendation and a school district decides not to do it, they are taking on a tremendous amount of liability. So once we recommend it, it is pretty well done. We’ve settled on an National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) recommendation that you should have an AED within three minutes access of any time you are practicing or competing and that seems to be working in our schools.”

Lawrence’s former teammate in Ohio, Matthew Bess, says recommendations are not enough and he hopes it will become a requirement in the future. When Lawrence passed away, there was not an AED nearby. He believes it would have saved his friend’s life that day.

“I don’t just think it would have, I know it would have. If we’d have had one close, you just pop that baby on there and it tells you what to do. If there had been one on the field, near the field, he’d have been here today,” Bess said.

Bess his now the athletic director at South Gallia High School. The school possesses six different AEDs. Bess does what is not required in Ohio; have an AED present at all games and practices. He hopes lawmakers and athletic officials around the country will take additional steps to ensure the safety of young athletes.

“I lived through 1997 when one of my good friends and teammate passed away because of something that could have been prevented. I don’t want to have to go through that as an administrator, parent or teacher,” Bess said. “I’ve already been through it as a student and teammate, and I don’t want to go through that again.”

Copyright 2022 WSAZ. All rights reserved.
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
Sonoma, CA HS save results in positive editorial admin 06/23/2022 10:24 PM
Sonoma newspaper editorial reports the value of school AEDs and CPR/AED training for students that resulted in a life saved.

https://www.sonomanews.com/article/...s-demonstrate-power-of-cpr-aed-training/

June 21, 2022, 9:00AM


A group of Sonoma Valley teens swooped into action when their friend’s heart stopped beating while playing basketball on Thursday. They started CPR, physically forcing the heart to pump. They also located the nearest automated external defibrillator (AED) to try to shock his heart back to life.

As Fire Chief Steve Akre perfectly summarized: “They did everything they could do. They did everything right.”

Three cheers to these young people, who kept their wits about them in a terrifying series of events. They managed to put fears aside and focus on saving their friend, using all the tools at their disposal.

It helped that Sonoma Valley High School is equipped with five AED machines spread around campus. The one used by the teens was located right by the basketball court and glowed bright red in the dark, making it noticeable from a distance. Such features should be a staple on all high school campuses, along with life-saving equipment and CPR training.

According to the Mayo Clinic, “sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes. Estimates vary, but some reports suggest that about 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 80,000 young athletes die of sudden cardiac death each year.”

Such incidents are just familiar enough that they’re worth preparing for. And these students likely were prepared when it comes to CPR. Sonoma Valley High requires students to take CPR in their first semester of P.E. II (students who waive that class must show proof of being CPR certified), according to Superintendent Dr. Adrian Palazuelos.


Beyond what is learned on campus, the American Red Cross has prepared people for the worst for more than a century. In addition to online courses ($35) that cover both CPR and how to use an AED. To be officially certified in life-saving treatments, in-person classes ($42 to $126) are available multiple times a week at the Santa Rosa office of the Red Cross.

Another helpful tool can be found with the PulsePoint AED app, available for download for free from the App Store. Many readers might be familiar with the fire watch app PulsePoint, which gives regular updates on reported fires. This sister app crowdsources the location of AED machines in the community; for those moments, you need to find one quickly. From the Sonoma Community Center to Benziger Family Winery, dozens of these critical machines are located throughout our Valley. (Glen Ellen, it should be noted, only has three confirmed AEDs. There are likely more machines that have not been reported to the PulsePoint AED app. It would be beneficial to all to add more, if anyone knows where they are).

Moments like this are a good reminder to all of us to check in with our skills, and make sure we’re up to date in case the unthinkable ever happens. And if that ever happens, let’s all hope for the grace under pressure shown by those heroic teens on Thursday night.
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
Wife of university President saved with school AED admin 06/23/2022 10:17 PM
University of Alabama -Huntsville reports wife of then University President saved with campus AED

https://www.uah.edu/news/items/nurs...mpus-aed-unit-to-save-olli-member-s-life


Michael Mercier / UAH

For alumna Amber McPhail (BSN, Nursing, 2001; MSN, FNP, 2003), an afternoon of routine appointments at the Faculty and Staff Clinic turned into anything but one fateful day in April 2017. That was the day a life-and-death emergency struck like a spring thunderbolt on the campus of The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of The University of Alabama System.

McPhail is the UAH Director of Student Health Services and Interim Director of UAH Health Services, located on the third floor of Wilson Hall. Five years ago, Patricia “Miss Patti” Patrick was attending a group discussion in the same building only two floors down as a member of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UAH (OLLI at UAH). Neither of them could have guessed how dramatically their lives were about to intersect, a moment in time they both will likely remember for the rest of their lives.

“I have been a member of OLLI for several years and have taken a number of classes,” Miss Patti Patrick says. “On that day I was taking a class called Socrates Café where we discussed current controversial events. We had discussed a lot of things politically for a year or so, and this was the very first day of spring class, one o’clock on Monday, April 17, 2017. I was sitting there in my wheelchair, and I started the class by saying I had finally found something I agreed with the President about! And then I died!”

Meanwhile, two floors above in the Faculty Staff Clinic, McPhail was attending to an ordinary office visit with no idea of the drama unfolding below her, when someone burst into the clinic.

“I was in the FSC clinic seeing a patient, when our Office Manager came to get me out of the exam room,” McPhail recalls. “She said that Ms. Altenkirch was here and said someone had passed out downstairs on the first floor.”

“Ms. Altenkirch” turned out to be none other than Beth Altenkirch, wife of then UAH President, Robert A. Altenkirch. She was there attending the same OLLI course as Miss Patti as part of the member-based learning community for adults age 50-plus.

“I followed Ms. Altenkirch down to the lobby where Mrs. Patti was sitting, slumped over and gasping,” McPhail says. “I couldn't feel a pulse, so I moved her over to the carpet to lay her down to check her ABCs (Airway, Breathing, Circulation/pulse). I directed one of the OLLI staff to go get the AED.”

AED stands for ‘automated external defibrillator,’ a portable device used as a rapid response method to save lives during a cardiac arrest. If you've ever watched a TV medical drama, chances are you've seen someone shocked back to life by a health care provider who yells "Clear" before delivering a jolt of electricity to the person's chest to get the heart beating again. AEDs don’t require a prescription and can be used at home and in schools and are also found in a number of public places, such as malls, office buildings, sports arenas, gyms and airplanes.

“There are 93 AEDs on campus, to include Redstone,” says Kristi Dendy, Campus Safety Specialist in the Office of Environmental Health and Safety at Shelbie King Hall. “This is the first time one has actually been used that we know of.”

The units are located on odd numbered floors in campus buildings, usually near an elevator. Once switched on, the lightweight device provides the operator with step-by-step voice instructions. “The AED doesn't require anyone to actually have any special training to use it, as long as they can follow directions,” McPhail says. “As long as they think to actually get the AED – they can do it! It tells you when to shock, and it won't let you shock if it is not advised/indicated.”

AEDs are designed to be used in the sort of situation where speed can make all the difference in patient outcomes, exactly the case when Miss Patti collapsed.

“She was barely breathing, and I couldn't feel a pulse,” McPhail says after examining Miss Patti on the floor of the lobby in front of the Wilson Hall Theatre. “So I immediately applied the AED pads to her chest and turned on the device. It announced that it was analyzing and said not to touch the patient.”

Cardiac arrest usually occurs when a disruption in the heart's electrical activity causes a dangerously fast heartbeat (ventricular tachycardia) or a fast and irregular heartbeat (ventricular fibrillation). Either of these irregular rhythms keeps the heart from pumping effectively and can cause it to stop. When this happens, the brain and other vital organs don't get the blood and oxygen they need and requires treatment within minutes to prevent death. Also, the sooner the heart's rhythm is restored, the greater the chance there won't be permanent damage to the brain and other organs. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after cardiac arrest can keep blood flowing to the heart and brain for a time, but often only defibrillation can restore the heart's rhythm.

Once the AED had rapidly completed its analysis of Miss Patti’s condition, it was time to signal the defibrillator to deliver its lifesaving jolt.

“It said, ‘Shock Advised, please clear the victim,’” McPhail remembers. “I then cleared her and pressed the 'shock' button which delivered a defibrillation to the patient. After that, it told me to continue with CPR/chest compressions. I started chest compressions and at that same time the EMTs arrived.”

What some might call an astonishing series of fortunate circumstances working for her survival, Miss Patti sees as nothing short of miraculous set of events.

“There were so many factors that happened!” she says. “The wife of the then president of UAH was a member of our group, and she was there and saw what had happened. That was miracle number 1! She had just toured the medical facilities on the third floor of Wilson Hall, so she ran upstairs and brought the nurse down, which was miracle number 2! The fact that they had the paddle thing [AED] in the hall, that was miracle number 3!”

McPhail made sure the miracles didn’t go for naught by continuing CPR and monitoring the AED until the EMTs arrived on the scene. “They kept her on our AED while we continued chest compressions, gave her breaths using their ambu bag and started an IV,” the Nursing alumna says. “The AED again announced it was 'analyzing patient and to pause compressions.’ After a few seconds it said, ‘Shock advised, please clear the victim.’ I again cleared the patient and pressed the 'shock' button. After the defibrillation, they continued compressions and switched the heart monitor over to their machine. Then they loaded her onto their stretcher and proceeded to transport her to the hospital emergency department.”

One might wonder what Miss Patti herself was experiencing during such intense trauma as several strangers battled to save her life.

“It was a total blank!” she reports. “I just disappeared; everything was totally gone. I have no memory of anything from that moment on until about five days later, because they had to do all kinds of things to save my life, like put me into a coma in a very cold situation to preserve my primary organs. I had to be in rehab for two and a half weeks. I looked awful. My niece was there when I woke up, and the first thing I said was, where’s my purse! She knew for sure I wasn’t brain dead!”

Just 11 days before, the OLLI student had had a colonoscopy, “and it wiped out my potassium,” Miss Patti says. “My heart doctor knew right off what had happened. I have to take potassium every night for rest of my life.”

But that’s a minor annoyance, as she approaches each day with new zest since having been given her life back.

“I’m 82, but I can remember stuff way on back,” Miss Patti says. “The neurologist pointed to the heavens like ‘you had a really good break there.’ I had some of the normal feelings. Why me? Why did I survive this? It was such a close call. Maybe that’s all there is, but I’ve had too many things in my life that have happened that make me think there is something else afterwards. That’s what I’m left with: there’s too much evidence afoot.”

Miss Patti has weathered a number of severe personal ‘storms’ in her life, including cancer, a heart attack and losing everything she owned to hurricane Katrina. “I shouldn’t have lived through that,” she says. “So now I tell myself, get over it, be grateful!”

As for the person who saved her life? McPhail and her patient have forged a special bond.

“Her brother came by to see me and tell me that she was stable,” McPhail says. “She was in the ICU, but she had a good prognosis since the cardiac arrest was most likely due to a severe potassium deficiency. So often in the hospital we never got to see patients once they transferred out of our units or went home. When she came in to meet me in September 2017, she was doing great. It was awesome to see that her life was saved and she was back to normal functioning!”

Fast forward to 2022, almost exactly five years after the incident, and Miss Patti showed up recently at the clinic for her COVID booster shot. “It was so great to see her again, and she is as sharp as ever,” McPhail reports. “It shows you what a difference CPR can make! She’s had five years added on to her life and is still going strong!”

That fact is thanks in large part to McPhail’s cool nerves and quick thinking, with an assist from medical technology and her training.

“Amber had never been able to meet people she had helped save,” Miss Patti says. “My brother found her, and I got to meet her. She’s great! It’s really something to be able to hug the person who literally saved your life because of her training and desire to do that. Now the people at OLLI laugh about it, saying they will use me as promotional material! I told them, just make sure you spell my name right!”
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International Public AEDs Jump to new posts
Near death of Singapore father inspires son to learn CPR admin 06/14/2022 9:45 PM
https://www.straitstimes.com/singap...spires-man-to-pick-up-cpr-and-aed-skills

Ryan Goh
PUBLISHED MAY 21, 2022, 2:07 PM SGT

SINGAPORE - Valet operator B. P. Jackson was woken up by his wife late at night in July 2019 when she witnessed his 74-year-old father suffering a cardiac arrest and collapsing.

"I saw him on the floor and there was a pool of blood surrounding him," said Mr Jackson, 49.

Detecting no pulse for his father, he called 995 and attempted to carry out cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) - with instructions from the dispatcher.

Elaborating on his emotions during the ordeal, he said: "It was really stressful, I did not know if I was doing it correctly. If I had the experience and the knowledge, I would have been able to deliver it better."

With his father's condition now stable, Mr Jackson intends to join a CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) course and get certified as a first aider to be able to help others facing a similar situation.

An AED is a medical device that can analyse the heart's rhythm and, if necessary, deliver an electrical shock to help the heart re-establish an effective rhythm.

"(The course) will be useful at any point in time, so that you would be more confident that what you are doing is right," he said.
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AED and resuscitation research Jump to new posts
Do school CPR classes make a difference? ACC report admin 06/14/2022 9:42 PM
American College of Cardiology reports on value of state requirements for CPR/AED training in schools

https://www.miragenews.com/requiring-cpraed-training-in-schools-can-787372/


Requiring CPR/AED training in schools can improve OHCA rates
American College of Cardiology

States with laws requiring CPR/automated external defibrillator (AED) training in high school have higher rates of bystander CPR (BCPR) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) than states with no CPR education laws, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

About 377,000 adults and 23,000 children experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) each year in the United States, with relatively low survival rates. Reports show that early use of CPR and defibrillation by a trained bystander contribute to lower mortality rates. Many states have enacted required CPR/AED training, specifically in high schools, in anticipation of improving OHCA outcome survival.

“BCPR and AED use rates remain low in the US. Lack of knowledge of CPR and AED use results in failure to perform these life-saving skills when needed,” said Victoria Vetter, MD, MPH, an attending cardiologist and cardiac electrophysiologist in the Division of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the study’s lead author.

In this study, researchers examined whether rates of BCPR following OHCA differ in states with laws requiring CPR/AED training in schools compared to those without such mandates. At the time of the study, CPR/AED training for high school students was required in 39 out of 50 states and the District of Columbia to improve bystander involvement in OHCA events. The study authors analyzed the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) dataset from January 1, 2013, through December 31, 2020, for all 911-activated non-traumatic OHCA events where CPR or AED use was attempted. Arrests in medical facilities, nursing homes or witnessed by 911 responders were excluded.

Twenty states were eligible for evaluation and placed in two separate categories: states with CPR/AED education laws and states without a CPR/AED education law. Cardiac arrests were categorized in states with laws as occurring either on or after the law was enacted (pre- and post-law enactment).

Over half of the OHCAs occurred in states with laws enacted and the rate of BCPR was 41.6% compared to 39.5% in states without any mandates. After tracking pre- and post-law enactment outcomes by year, rates of BCPR show a higher trend after the first year of state law enactment, specifically in five of the 10 states that had laws enacted during the study period. Researchers found disparities by gender and race in study, but those groups, specifically blacks, showed the greatest improvements in outcomes in states with laws enacted.

Researchers said the findings also suggest that low economic status communities could see the greatest benefits from help in enacting CPR/AED education mandates.

“Targeting student populations in underserved and minority communities with low rates of BCPR should help by providing a trained group of individuals who live in the communities, decreasing these health disparities, Vetter said. “High school students will become the next generation of bystanders who can provide CPR and AED use, once they are educated. Those trained as students are likely to be in homes or community sites where cardiac arrests commonly occur.”

While the study’s models accounted for various factors that may influence BCPR rates, limitations include the recent implementation of some BCPR laws. Also, states were not identifiable, so researchers were not able to gather state level characteristics, such as population health measures, which may impact the propensity for laws to be enacted and OHCA outcomes. CARES also does not collect data from all EMS systems, which may limit the true generalizability of the findings.

The study authors said they encourage future research with complete state-specific data and recent implementation of legislation mandates is needed to further support adding CPR education training in schools to improve OHCA survival rates.

/Public Release. This material from the originating organization/author(s) may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author(s).View in full here.
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
Project ADAM helps middle TN schools with AED program results admin 06/14/2022 9:27 PM
Vanderbilt University Medical Center reports on school AED initiative success



https://news.vumc.org/2022/05/03/teens-life-saved-thanks-to-childrens-hospital-aed-training-program/



by Jessica Pasley

Just before the second bell rang at Station Camp High School in Gallatin, Tennessee, Linton Beck, 16, was sitting at his desk talking to a fellow student.

The room was filling with students waiting for chemistry class to start.

Then Linton’s eyes rolled back, and he slumped over.

His classmate immediately sprang into action and alerted the teacher, which set off a series of life-saving events.

Linton was having a sudden cardiac arrest.

Station Camp High School is among 326 schools to achieve the Heart Safe School designation through Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt’s Project ADAM (Automated Defibrillators in Adam’s Memory).

Project ADAM is a national organization committed to making schools “heart safe” by preventing sudden cardiac death in schools and communities through education and life-saving programs.

“The presence of AEDs in schools and throughout the community, combined with people who are prepared to respond, is key to saving lives,” said English Flack, MD, assistant professor of Pediatric Cardiology and medical director of Project ADAM Middle Tennessee. “Sumner County has been a shining example of emergency preparedness, and Linton’s school has consistently engaged with us to perform their annual AED drills in compliance with Tennessee legislation.

“Our goal is for every school in Middle Tennessee to have a practiced sudden cardiac arrest emergency response plan in order to act in the very manner that Linton’s school did.”

Linton and his family are grateful that the school was prepared.

“I don’t remember anything from the event,” said Linton. “I remember walking to class and then I remember waking up in the hospital.

“I’m just happy I was in the right place at the right time; I was around people who knew what to do. There was a plan in place.

“In the past, I noticed there’s a box on the wall saying AED, but now that I’ve gone through this, that sign is a bigger deal.

“I will be more alert to where AEDs are located when I am out. It will be on my radar to get training to help others.”

Children’s Hospital’s Project ADAM is one of 34 affiliate organizations across 26 states. The program recently celebrated its fifth anniversary.

“What an incredible gift of life we now celebrate,” said Flack.

An estimated 350,000 out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrests occur each year in the United States, and about 7,000 of those are in people younger than 18. The national survival rate for sudden cardiac arrest is less than 12%, according to the American Heart Association.

“Because of the quick response of the school staff, Linton is alive and will be able to continue being a member of the cross country team,” said Stephen Beck, Linton’s dad. “My son is here today because of the school’s response. They reacted. They were trained. They were prepared.”

Linton has been running cross country since the third grade. He had no previous health issues.

Station Camp High School has five AEDs on school grounds.

Sumner County Schools was one of the first school districts in the Midstate to achieve the Heart Safe School designation in 2018. In addition to that element of training, each school in the district has a S.E.T. (School Emergency Team) program. To become a S.E.T. member, participants must complete several hours of training outside of school hours. A sign on a classroom or office door designates team members.

Linton’s chemistry teacher, Jeremy Bartlett, was a S.E.T. participant who had recently fulfilled his CPR, AED and first aid training.

“Preparedness is the key piece here,” said Flack. “The S.E.T. members did an amazing job. The nursing team of Sumner County schools has a rigorous training program for the teachers and coaches who bravely serve on this emergency response team.

“Using the guiding principles for the Project ADAM Heart Safe School designation, they are able to prepare for such an event.”
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Law enforcement use of AEDs Jump to new posts
Body-cam - OH police AED deployment and save admin 06/14/2022 1:38 AM
WKRC video shows body-cam of AED being used to save Miami Township, OH man. This is why all law enforcement should carry AEDs. Click link below to view.

https://local12.com/news/local/quic...unty-tristate-ohio-kentucky-indiana-news

MIAMI TOWNSHIP, Ohio (WKRC) - An automated external defibrillator, known as AED, is what helped save a local man’s life.

WKRC

The quick action from first responders is all caught on camera. It was a team effort from the Miami Township Police, Fire and EMS that helped save the 45-year-old man’s life in late March.

The Miami Township Police Department posted body camera video of the entire incident to Facebook.



In the video, you can hear a man at the scene telling officers, “He just collapsed and he said he wasn’t feeling good.”

Officers arrived just three minutes after the call.

“That particular morning, Miami Township Fire and EMS was dispatched initially for what was reported as possibly a person unconscious, but was quickly upgraded to a non-breather to a cardiac arrest,” Miami T ownship Fire and EMS Assistant Chief Daniel Mack. “In an event like that, not only do the fire and EMS units respond, but also the police department. Any nearby police units will respond because they also carry some equipment that can help us to save the life of a victim whose heart is stopped.”

In the body cam video, you can see responders using an AED to help save the man.

“It's perhaps one of the most important pieces of medical equipment when it comes to saving lives that’s come out, literally, in the last 50 years,” Mack said. “Miami Township Police has been carrying AEDs for many, many years, and we've had a number of times when having that AED there early has made the difference in being able to restart someone's heart.”

Mack says early defibrillation makes all the difference when it comes to successful resuscitation. He was on scene that day. Turns out, the person they saved is one of Mack’s friends.

“He's doing remarkably well, I'm happy to say,” Mack said. “If you were to meet him today and talk to him, you would not believe that he'd ever been clinically dead for part of that period of time in his life.”

A big part of the success comes from the use of the AED. Mack says it’s easily operable.

“It talks to you and takes you step by step in what you need to do. And even for someone who is very nervous, that voice is there to tell you everything that you need to do and it'll advise you to tell you whether to press the red button, which then delivers the shock,” Mack said.

Mack encourages everyone to take a CPR class.

“In the CPR classes that are done for the lay public, the CPR classes include information on how to use the AED. And we encourage everyone to take a class because you never know when you may need to use the information,” Mack said.

It’s a life-saving device that makes all the difference.
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Public access AEDs in China admin 06/14/2022 12:57 AM
Xiamen News reports on AED use in China



https://news.xmnn.cn/xmnn/2022/06/13/101048416.shtml


 Xiamen Net News (Text/Photo by Xiamen Daily reporter Meng Jing) On June 10, the A09 page of this newspaper reported that a citizen suddenly fainted and had cardiac arrest in the badminton hall of Difeng Sports Center. Fortunately, two cardiac surgeons in the basketball hall next door Seizing the precious "golden 4 minutes" to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the injured and successfully rescuing citizens with hidden coronary heart disease from the brink of life and death has aroused the attention of the general public.

  Since the accident venue was not equipped with an automatic external defibrillator (AED) for emergency prevention, the two surgeons could only rely on manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation during the rescue process, and they persisted for about 15 minutes. It is understood that AED is known as a "life-saving artifact". In the "golden 4 minutes" of the best rescue of cardiac arrest, the use of this device for defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation can effectively prevent sudden death.

  This report also sparked further discussion among citizens: Are all local sports venues equipped with AEDs? What is the distribution of AEDs across the city? Yesterday, the reporter visited many local sports venues and consulted doctors and the Red Cross to understand the situation.


  There are basic configurations in public stadiums

  In April, the city sports center AED successfully rescued a citizen

  Yesterday morning, the reporter visited the table tennis halls, badminton halls, basketball halls and other sports venues on the island successively. During the visit, the reporter found that public gymnasiums are basically equipped with AEDs, while most private gymnasiums are not.

  In the Municipal Sports Center Complex, an AED is placed at the reception desk on the first and second floors. The reporter noticed that the two AEDs were installed in a transparent green box, and the box was marked with the word AED, a red logo with an electric shock symbol inside a heart shape, and a flow chart for use. Afterwards, reporters also saw an AED in the outdoor running track of the Municipal Sports Center and the Workers Gymnasium Complex.

  According to the staff of the above-mentioned gymnasium, all staff of the gymnasium will conduct regular training on the operation of AED. The AEDs in the museum are used online, and relevant personnel regularly inspect and maintain the equipment. "In April of this year, the AED in the badminton hall successfully rescued a citizen, and the person involved later sent a pennant." The staff of the Municipal Sports Center Complex said.

  Subsequently, the reporter came to a basketball hall and badminton hall on Jinhu Road. According to the relevant person in charge, there is currently no AED in the museum, and relevant prevention is mainly done by providing accident insurance for customers and conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

  "At present, there is no official mandatory requirement for private gyms to install AEDs, and the price of the equipment is relatively expensive," said a businessman. Another businessman said that he intends to equip AEDs in sports venues, but does not know the specific purchase channels. In addition, the follow-up installation guidance, teaching training and equipment maintenance of AED are also a big problem. Subsequently, the reporter searched AED from the e-commerce platform and learned from the customer service that some products promised to provide users with one-to-one installation guidance and first aid training after purchase.

  "Myocardial infarction is very sudden. I think not only gymnasiums, but also major public places such as local airports and schools should be equipped with AEDs, and relevant personnel should also undergo AED first aid training. Operation." Citizen Ms. Yang said.

  distributed

  Major attractions, public schools, etc.

  254 units have been installed and more than 200 units are being installed

  The reporter learned from the Xiamen Red Cross Society that at present, the city has put 254 AEDs in public places such as major scenic spots, stadiums, docks, etc., and has carried out AED use training for staff in public places around AEDs. According to the "Notice on Further Promoting the Implementation Plan for the City's Red Cross Emergency Rescue Work" previously issued by the Xiamen Municipal People's Government, the local area will gradually expand the deployment range and density of AEDs. Target.

  "At present, there are 19 stations along the Shanhai Health Trail, one each for the ferry terminal, the first terminal and the Sanqiutian terminal; there are 25 stations in Gulangyu, 3 in the Municipal Sports Center, and one in the Tong'an Sports Center. Administrative service centers, administrative service centers in Jimei District, and most public schools are all distributed.” Relevant personnel revealed that last year, the Municipal Public Security Bureau purchased 78 units and distributed them to various police stations. Currently, 26 units are being installed in the municipal government office building; there are 225 AED units in the city. Installation is in progress.

   How important is AED?

  Ke Shaofan, deputy chief physician of the Cardiac Surgery Department of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, said: "If cardiac arrest exceeds the 'golden 4 minutes', the brain tissue will be irreversibly damaged. If it exceeds 10 minutes, the success rate of resuscitation is almost zero." The reality It is difficult for emergency personnel to arrive at the scene within 4 minutes. "If AEDs are deployed in public places, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed within 1 minute, and AED defibrillation is performed within 3 to 5 minutes, and the survival rate of cardiac arrest patients can reach 50% to 70%." Ke Shaofan said.
0 21 Read More
Law enforcement use of AEDs Jump to new posts
Family donating AEDs to law enforcement to honor Father's death. admin 06/14/2022 12:51 AM
Milford Daily News reports family honoring father's/husbands death by donating AEDs to law enforcement.



https://www.milforddailynews.com/st...olice-after-loved-ones-death/9199259002/

Norman Miller
The Milford Daily News

On June 10, 2017, David Greenwood collapsed on his garage floor in Mendon, suffering sudden cardiac arrest.

The first public safety personnel to respond was a police officer who was not able to provide the emergency care needed in the form of an automatic external defibrillator (AED).

Greenwood, who was 54 years old, died.

“I trusted the police officer would show up and they’d have the equipment needed to help my father and we learned that wasn’t the case,” said Greenwood’s daughter, Jessica Skole. “Every single second matters — every single second.”

Greenwood was a healthy man and had just come back from a bike ride when he suffered cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest, which occurs when the heart stops, is different from a heart attack, where blood is prevented from reaching a section of the heart.

Greenwood's other daughter, Erika Greenwood, an EMT, performed CPR but a defibrillator would have been more effective.

Although it can’t be known for sure whether David Greenwood would have survived with an AED, he would have had a better chance, Skole said.

“It was a tragic event that changed our lives forever,” Skole said.

Because of what happened, the two sisters and their mother, Denise Greenwood, started six10.org, named for the day David Greenwood died. The purpose of the group is to help police departments equip their cruisers with AEDs and to make it a state law that all cruisers in Massachusetts are equipped with one.

The organization made its first donation in 2018 to the Hopedale Police Department. More recently, it donated seven AEDs to the Westborough Police Department.

“What we found is that this is a significant problem for smaller police departments,” Skole said.

AEDs cost about $1,200 each. Six10.org raises money through an annual golf tournament and donations to help pay for the AEDs.

In addition to donating AEDs, the group is working with the Legislature to require all police departments to have them because police officers are often on the scene first
“With every minute, the likelihood of surviving goes down 10%,” said Denise Greenwood. “If someone has to wait five minutes, they only have a 50% chance of surviving.”

Working with legislators, the group got a bill sponsored in 2020 to make it the law for AEDs to be in cruisers, but then the COVID-19 pandemic happened and it got pushed to the back burner. The bill has been refiled this year and Skole and Denise Greenwood said hopes are high.

“We don’t want what happened to us to happen to another family,” Denise Greenwood said.

To donate, or to contact the organization about getting AEDs, go to six10.org.
0 23 Read More
School AEDs Jump to new posts
7000 school deaths per year prompts bipartisan federal AED Bill admin 06/13/2022 7:11 PM
WEAU reports on bipartisan legislation to make AEDs available for more schools.


https://www.weau.com/2022/02/17/american-heart-month-fathers-plea-student-access-aeds/

By Kristin Kasper
Published: Feb. 17, 2022 at 8:33 AM PST

WASHINGTON (Gray DC) - Just like the final buzzer or the roar of the crowd, an athlete’s heartbeat, accelerated yet steady, is a competition constant.

But far too often...

“She went into sudden cardiac arrest.”

Shawn Sima’s daughter Lexi was 16 when she collapsed on a treadmill in 2016. He says she’s alive today because of quick-thinking bystanders and her fortunate proximity to an automated external defibrillator, or AED.

“That night there was a miracle,” said Sima. “My daughter survived the most unsurvivable thing for anybody.”

According to data compiled by the heart-screening organization Who We Play For, sudden cardiac arrest strikes more than 7,000 young people each year. An estimated 90 percent of victims die because of a delay in emergency response.

“You have three to five minutes to do something,” said Sima. “The average ambulance response in the United States is seven to 14 minutes. You do the math.”

Sima wants every school and training field to have an AED, but the devices are costly. Not only must the devices be maintained, students and teachers must be trained in their use.

“I think it might take federal legislation to make sure it happens,” said Florida Rep. Al Lawson (D-Fla.)

Lawson reintroduced a bill that would create a federal program to put more devices in schools. Specifically, it would authorize the Secretary of Health and Human Services to award grants to a local or private elementary or secondary school to create a program to promote student access to defibrillation.

Lawson says the measure was drafted in memory of Rafe Maccarone, a young Florida athlete who died of sudden cardiac arrest in 2007 on the goal line of a high school soccer field.

“There was an AED that was on the school grounds, but it was locked in the school office, so there was no access to it,” said Ralph Maccarone, Rafe’s father. “So [having] access to AEDs and having someone properly trained to utilize the AED could have saved my son’s life.”

Rafe’s friends, who are now in their thirties, spent the last 15 years raising awareness for sudden cardiac arrest. They developed the organization, Who We Play For.

With Ralph Maccarone’s help, they’ve inspired teams and communities to push for heart screenings and pass local CPR training laws.

Standing behind Lawson’s bill, Maccarone says they have more work to do.

“We’ve got to keep pushing forward,” said Maccarone. “Until we can get access to AEDS, CPR, and EKGs, we’re going to keep fighting.”

Lawson first introduced the Access to AEDs Act in 2019, but it did not receive a vote. He introduced the bipartisan legislation again this month.
0 23 Read More
School AEDs Jump to new posts
Japan study of 1500 school deaths have good lessons for US ! admin 06/13/2022 7:05 PM
NHK reports 70% SCA events in school do not report AED use. Study of 1500 student deaths.

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/special/education/articles/article_33.html


70% of children with "sudden death" using AED at school are not listed
June 4, 2022

Approximately 1,500 children die in 16 years due to accidents at school or kindergarten or sudden illness.

As a result of NHK's investigation based on public data, it became clear that about 30%, or nearly 500 people, were "sudden death."
Furthermore, in 70% of "sudden death", there was no mention of whether or not AED, which is considered to be effective for lifesaving, was used.

Experts point out that the data is "insufficient to verify the process by which lifesaving measures were taken."


I talked to one of her mothers.


Asuka, the daughter of Toshiko Kirita of Saitama City (at that time, a sixth grader), suddenly suffered a heart attack in the school playground while practicing a relay race and collapsed, and died the next day.

According to a survey by Saitama City, Asuka was in a state of needing treatment with an AED immediately after her fall.


However, at that time, the teachers in the field thought that they had breathing and pulse, and could not immediately determine that treatment with AED was necessary.

Toshiko said, "I was always frustrated at first as to why no one tried to use the AED. I learned of a case where I died in a similar situation in the past, and I wondered if the same thing would happen again. I had a strong sense of crisis. "

Even though it was an accident that left a big lesson
In 2012, after Asuka's death, the Saitama City Board of Education created an emergency response manual for teachers named "ASUKA Model" with Toshiko.

In addition, Toshiko herself continues to give lectures at schools all over the country so that she can learn the importance of AEDs by learning from her daughter.

Asuka's cases are also summarized in the "School Accident Case Search Database" published by the Japan Sports Promotion Center.

This database is used for grades and outbreaks submitted by schools and gardens to provide sympathy money for students and children who died in accidents or had serious disabilities while attending school or in kindergartens, nursery schools, elementary and junior high schools and high schools. It is a summary of the location, type and situation of the accident.


Asuka's case states, "In the school playground, during the extracurricular activities of the relay road race, I finished running 1000m, walked about 15m and then collapsed. I was immediately taken to the hospital and treated, but died the next day." ..

Toshiko feels sad that the accident left a big lesson about AED, but it didn't get through and ended with a very short sentence.

In addition, we believe that recurrence prevention will not be possible unless the details of the case are clarified as much as possible and the lessons learned are changed to a system that can be shared by everyone.

"I want you to describe the situation in detail so that the lessons of the accident can be conveyed."

Toshiko says, "By looking at the public database and knowing the accidents that are happening at other schools, you can be prepared for the accident that it may happen at your own school. I would like you to describe the situation in detail so that it can be communicated to the people who saw it. That may help prevent recurrence. "

Detailed analysis of school accidents
How many accidents have occurred in schools and kindergartens?

NHK has analyzed in detail more than 8400 data for the 16 years from 2005 to 2020, which are open to the public.

As a result, the number of children who died has risen to 1556, and the breakdown is as follows: ▽ High school students are the most 700, ▽ Junior high school students are 380, ▽ Elementary school students are 272, ▽ Kindergartens and nursery schools are 97, etc. increase.

Looking at the number of applications for condolence money by year, the number was the highest at 137 in 2011, and it has been declining gradually since then, but it has risen to more than 50 every year for the past few years.

Furthermore, when the cause of death was investigated in detail, it was found that 30% of the total, 490 people, were "sudden death" due to sudden cardiac arrest.

Since prompt AED treatment is effective in the event of cardiac arrest, the words "AED", "defibrillator", and "electric shock" in the description of the situation before and after the fall were extracted. , I investigated the frequency used in the data and the words used together.

70% of sudden deaths Whether or not AED is used No description

As a result, 70% (356 people) of sudden death did not have a description, and it was not clear from the data whether or not AED was used.

On the other hand, although the rest (134 people) had a description about AED, only about 10% (19 people) showed the passage of time until the device was used, such as "immediately" and "immediately". ..

It is said that the lifesaving rate decreases by 10% every minute when the electric shock caused by the AED is delayed, but the data of the Japan Sports Promotion Center has specific descriptions such as the time from collapse to use and the distance to the installation location. There wasn't.

Also, of the 134 people who had an AED, 28 (20%) were used after the emergency services arrived, and I do not know the details such as why they fell down and did not use the equipment immediately. did.

Expert "How to record and verify lifesaving processes and issues"
Professor Taku Ishimi of the Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, who is a doctor and familiar with sudden death at school, said that the data of the Japan Sports Promotion Center is very valuable big data to understand the situation of the accident. "It's not enough to verify how the lifesaving procedure was done, because it doesn't say how the AED was used or why it didn't work," he said.


After that, "To prevent recurrence, the distance from the fallen place to the place where the AED was placed, the time until the device was used, the judgment of the corresponding teacher, etc. were further enhanced and verified, and the school and society as a whole It is important to connect it to countermeasures. "

In some cases, there is an AED but it is not used
It is said that there have been cases of sudden death at school that were not used despite the presence of AEDs.

According to Professor Ishimi of Kyoto University, who is familiar with sudden death at school, there are two main cases.

<1. Is the AED installed in the wrong place? >
First of all, there are cases where the AED is located far away or there are times when it cannot be used.

In the case of a boy in the third year of junior high school who had a cardiac arrest while practicing baseball for club activities on the school ground, the AED was in a school building away from the ground and it took a long time to get it, so it could not be used.

Also, in the case of another high school boy who lost consciousness during club activities, the school building was locked and could not be taken out because it was night.

In this case, the school subsequently revised the location of the AED to a ground or the like.


According to Professor Ishimi, the best place to install an AED is based on the following conditions.

▽ Near a playground or gymnasium where there is a high risk of cardiac arrest ▽
Within 1 minute one way to a site that may be used ▽ A
place that anyone can access 24 hours a day

He also points out that in order to prevent recurrence, it is necessary to record more detailed processes and responses for each case and consider countermeasures.

<2. I didn't use it because I had breathing>
The other case is when a fallen child is breathing and decides that an AED is not needed.

When you suddenly have a cardiac arrest, you may have a cramp-like symptom called "agonal respiration," in which breathing is interrupted.

Such breathing that is clearly different from usual is a "sign of using AED", but there are actually cases where many people do not know and responded by recognizing that "you should not use AED because you are breathing". It means that there was.

"Don't hesitate when you get lost, get an AED right away."
Professor Ishimi said, "The AED automatically analyzes the movement of the heart and determines whether an electric shock is necessary. It is important not to hesitate when in doubt and to use the AED immediately." increase.

67% of AED users reintegrate into society without sequelae
Unfortunately, there are cases where using an AED does not help.

However, many cases have been reported in which appropriate lifesaving measures saved lives.


According to a survey conducted by the Japanese Society of School Health, the number of cases of AED cardiopulmonary resuscitation for children and students in elementary schools, junior high schools, high schools, etc. was 147 during the five years from 2012 to 2016, of which about 67% (about 67%). 99) means that they have returned to society without any aftereffects.

Professor Ishimi said, "The use of AEDs can save many lives even in sudden cardiac arrest. It is not uncommon for cardiac arrests to occur at school, and we learned how to use AEDs so that any teacher or student can use them. It's very important to keep it in mind. "

Data analysis details
It is an analysis result of "school accident case search database".

From 2005 to 2020, 8404 cases in which death or disability compensation was paid are listed.

The Japan Sports Promotion Center says that these data can be viewed by anyone as a material for studying measures to prevent the recurrence of accidents. I hope they will be used at school sites.

Cases of death are on the decline
The details of the data.

Of the 8404 cases, 1556 children died during the 16 years from 2005 to 2020.

Let's take a closer look.

<By year (application for condolence money)>

Among the published data, there is a tendency for the number to decrease to
134 in 2005,
119 in 2006,
125 in 2007,
123 in 2008,
114 in 2009, and 115 in 2010.
increase.

▽ Increased to 137 in 2011, but decreased again
▽ 81 in 2012 ▽
85 in 2013 ▽
76 in 2014 ▽
83 in 2015 ▽
78 in 2016
▽ 77 in 2017
▽ 82 people in 2018 ▽
69 people in 2019
▽ 58 people in 2020, which is less than half in the last 16 years.

<By school>

High school has the highest number of deaths, accounting for 700 people, nearly half (45.0%) of the total.

Next, 380 junior high schools (24.4%), 272 elementary schools (17.5%), and 97 nursery schools and kindergartens (6.2%) show that the number of fatal accidents increases as the grade goes up.

<By location>

Looking at the places where the accident occurred,
▽ Roads are the most 575 people (37.0%)
▽ Classrooms and nursery rooms are 179 people (11.5%)
▽ Playgrounds, school playgrounds and gardens are 150 people (9.6%)
▽ Gymnasiums and 95 people (6.1%) in the indoor playground
▽ 49 people (3.1%) in the playground and stadium outside the school
▽ 36 people (2.3%) in the corridor
▽ 25 people (1.6%) in the pool ▽ 25 people (1.6%)
in the river )
▽ Toilet 23 people (1.6%)
▽ Sea and lake, swamp and pond 17 people (1.1%)
▽ Mountains and forests including ski resorts 16 people (1.0%)
▽ Gymnasiums outside the school 14 people (0.9%)
▽ Stairs 14 people (0.9%)
▽ Parks and amusement parks 14 people (0.9%)
▽ Veranda Is 12 people (0.8%).

The tendency to have the most roads does not change in elementary and junior high schools, high schools, etc., but in high schools, the second is the playground and school playground, and the third is the gymnasium and indoor playground, so there are opportunities for club activities compared to elementary and junior high schools. It seems that the increase is in the background.

On the other hand, nursery schools and kindergartens are often accompanied by parents to pick them up, and while the proportion of roads is decreasing, nursery rooms and classrooms account for 45 people, accounting for 46% of the total, which is the largest number.

<The cause of death>
The causes of death were
▽ "head trauma" in 472 (30.3%)
▽ "sudden cardiac death" in 267 (17.2%)
▽ "whole body bruise" in 177 (11.4%)
▽ "suffocation" 149 (9.6%)
▽ "Visceral injury" 119 (7.6%)
▽ "Large vascular sudden death" 118 (7.6%)
▽ "Central nervous system sudden death" 105 (6.7%)
▽ " 62 people (4.0%) had "drowning"
▽ 27 people (1.7%) had "heat stroke"
▽ 25 people (1.6%) had "cervical spinal cord injury"
▽ Others ・ The number of unknowns is 30 (1.9%).

<Sudden death by year>

Sudden death due to sudden changes in physical condition accounts for 30% of the cases of death, and there is a tendency for it to decrease.

▽ 45 in 2005 ▽
35 in 2006 ▽
41 in 2007 ▽
35 in 2008 ▽
39 in 2009
▽ 39 in 2010 ▽
38 in 2011 ▽
27 in 2012
▽ 2013 23 people in
2014 ▽ 25 people in 2014 ▽
30 people in 2015
▽ 19 people in 2016
▽ 25 people in 2017 ▽ 25 people
in 2018 ▽ 25 people
in 2019
▽ 19 people in 2020.

<By school>
By school, 178 (36.3%) were in high school, 126 (25.7%) were in junior high school, and 89 (18.2%) were in elementary school, and the rate of sudden death was particularly high in high school and junior high school.

<Occurrence status>
Looking at sudden death by situation, 140 people accounted for about 30% of the "extracurricular instruction" such as club activities such as baseball and athletics, followed by 96 people in "subjects" such as physical education classes.

<Sudden death by place>
In the data of sudden death, there are many cases where the physical condition suddenly changes when the body is moved.

▽ Playgrounds, school yard, and gardens in the school are the most 103 people (21%)
▽ Classrooms and nursery rooms are 95 people (19.4%)
▽ Gymnasiums and indoor playgrounds are 68 people (13.9%)
▽ Roads are 62 people (12.7 %) %)
▽ There were 29 people (5.9%) in the playground and stadium outside the school
▽ 12 people (2.4%) in the pool.

Status of AED usage
Prompt AED treatment is effective in the event of cardiac arrest.

When the words "AED", "defibrillator", and "electric shock" were extracted from the description of the situation before and after the fall, 134 out of 490 people had the description.

Looking at "who" used it,
▽ 102 people (76.1%) seemed to have used AEDs by faculty members and students
▽ 28 people (20.8%) used by paramedics
▽ 1 also used in hospitals There were people.

* For details, please refer to the Japan Sports Promotion Center "School Accident Case Search Database".
0 23 Read More
International Public AEDs Jump to new posts
Japan studies 1500 student deaths and AED availability admin 06/13/2022 7:04 PM
NHK reports 70% SCA events in school do not report AED use. Study of 1500 student deaths.

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/special/education/articles/article_33.html


70% of children with "sudden death" using AED at school are not listed
June 4, 2022

Approximately 1,500 children die in 16 years due to accidents at school or kindergarten or sudden illness.

As a result of NHK's investigation based on public data, it became clear that about 30%, or nearly 500 people, were "sudden death."
Furthermore, in 70% of "sudden death", there was no mention of whether or not AED, which is considered to be effective for lifesaving, was used.

Experts point out that the data is "insufficient to verify the process by which lifesaving measures were taken."


I talked to one of her mothers.


Asuka, the daughter of Toshiko Kirita of Saitama City (at that time, a sixth grader), suddenly suffered a heart attack in the school playground while practicing a relay race and collapsed, and died the next day.

According to a survey by Saitama City, Asuka was in a state of needing treatment with an AED immediately after her fall.


However, at that time, the teachers in the field thought that they had breathing and pulse, and could not immediately determine that treatment with AED was necessary.

Toshiko said, "I was always frustrated at first as to why no one tried to use the AED. I learned of a case where I died in a similar situation in the past, and I wondered if the same thing would happen again. I had a strong sense of crisis. "

Even though it was an accident that left a big lesson
In 2012, after Asuka's death, the Saitama City Board of Education created an emergency response manual for teachers named "ASUKA Model" with Toshiko.

In addition, Toshiko herself continues to give lectures at schools all over the country so that she can learn the importance of AEDs by learning from her daughter.

Asuka's cases are also summarized in the "School Accident Case Search Database" published by the Japan Sports Promotion Center.

This database is used for grades and outbreaks submitted by schools and gardens to provide sympathy money for students and children who died in accidents or had serious disabilities while attending school or in kindergartens, nursery schools, elementary and junior high schools and high schools. It is a summary of the location, type and situation of the accident.


Asuka's case states, "In the school playground, during the extracurricular activities of the relay road race, I finished running 1000m, walked about 15m and then collapsed. I was immediately taken to the hospital and treated, but died the next day." ..

Toshiko feels sad that the accident left a big lesson about AED, but it didn't get through and ended with a very short sentence.

In addition, we believe that recurrence prevention will not be possible unless the details of the case are clarified as much as possible and the lessons learned are changed to a system that can be shared by everyone.

"I want you to describe the situation in detail so that the lessons of the accident can be conveyed."

Toshiko says, "By looking at the public database and knowing the accidents that are happening at other schools, you can be prepared for the accident that it may happen at your own school. I would like you to describe the situation in detail so that it can be communicated to the people who saw it. That may help prevent recurrence. "

Detailed analysis of school accidents
How many accidents have occurred in schools and kindergartens?

NHK has analyzed in detail more than 8400 data for the 16 years from 2005 to 2020, which are open to the public.

As a result, the number of children who died has risen to 1556, and the breakdown is as follows: ▽ High school students are the most 700, ▽ Junior high school students are 380, ▽ Elementary school students are 272, ▽ Kindergartens and nursery schools are 97, etc. increase.

Looking at the number of applications for condolence money by year, the number was the highest at 137 in 2011, and it has been declining gradually since then, but it has risen to more than 50 every year for the past few years.

Furthermore, when the cause of death was investigated in detail, it was found that 30% of the total, 490 people, were "sudden death" due to sudden cardiac arrest.

Since prompt AED treatment is effective in the event of cardiac arrest, the words "AED", "defibrillator", and "electric shock" in the description of the situation before and after the fall were extracted. , I investigated the frequency used in the data and the words used together.

70% of sudden deaths Whether or not AED is used No description

As a result, 70% (356 people) of sudden death did not have a description, and it was not clear from the data whether or not AED was used.

On the other hand, although the rest (134 people) had a description about AED, only about 10% (19 people) showed the passage of time until the device was used, such as "immediately" and "immediately". ..

It is said that the lifesaving rate decreases by 10% every minute when the electric shock caused by the AED is delayed, but the data of the Japan Sports Promotion Center has specific descriptions such as the time from collapse to use and the distance to the installation location. There wasn't.

Also, of the 134 people who had an AED, 28 (20%) were used after the emergency services arrived, and I do not know the details such as why they fell down and did not use the equipment immediately. did.

Expert "How to record and verify lifesaving processes and issues"
Professor Taku Ishimi of the Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, who is a doctor and familiar with sudden death at school, said that the data of the Japan Sports Promotion Center is very valuable big data to understand the situation of the accident. "It's not enough to verify how the lifesaving procedure was done, because it doesn't say how the AED was used or why it didn't work," he said.


After that, "To prevent recurrence, the distance from the fallen place to the place where the AED was placed, the time until the device was used, the judgment of the corresponding teacher, etc. were further enhanced and verified, and the school and society as a whole It is important to connect it to countermeasures. "

In some cases, there is an AED but it is not used
It is said that there have been cases of sudden death at school that were not used despite the presence of AEDs.

According to Professor Ishimi of Kyoto University, who is familiar with sudden death at school, there are two main cases.

<1. Is the AED installed in the wrong place? >
First of all, there are cases where the AED is located far away or there are times when it cannot be used.

In the case of a boy in the third year of junior high school who had a cardiac arrest while practicing baseball for club activities on the school ground, the AED was in a school building away from the ground and it took a long time to get it, so it could not be used.

Also, in the case of another high school boy who lost consciousness during club activities, the school building was locked and could not be taken out because it was night.

In this case, the school subsequently revised the location of the AED to a ground or the like.


According to Professor Ishimi, the best place to install an AED is based on the following conditions.

▽ Near a playground or gymnasium where there is a high risk of cardiac arrest ▽
Within 1 minute one way to a site that may be used ▽ A
place that anyone can access 24 hours a day

He also points out that in order to prevent recurrence, it is necessary to record more detailed processes and responses for each case and consider countermeasures.

<2. I didn't use it because I had breathing>
The other case is when a fallen child is breathing and decides that an AED is not needed.

When you suddenly have a cardiac arrest, you may have a cramp-like symptom called "agonal respiration," in which breathing is interrupted.

Such breathing that is clearly different from usual is a "sign of using AED", but there are actually cases where many people do not know and responded by recognizing that "you should not use AED because you are breathing". It means that there was.

"Don't hesitate when you get lost, get an AED right away."
Professor Ishimi said, "The AED automatically analyzes the movement of the heart and determines whether an electric shock is necessary. It is important not to hesitate when in doubt and to use the AED immediately." increase.

67% of AED users reintegrate into society without sequelae
Unfortunately, there are cases where using an AED does not help.

However, many cases have been reported in which appropriate lifesaving measures saved lives.


According to a survey conducted by the Japanese Society of School Health, the number of cases of AED cardiopulmonary resuscitation for children and students in elementary schools, junior high schools, high schools, etc. was 147 during the five years from 2012 to 2016, of which about 67% (about 67%). 99) means that they have returned to society without any aftereffects.

Professor Ishimi said, "The use of AEDs can save many lives even in sudden cardiac arrest. It is not uncommon for cardiac arrests to occur at school, and we learned how to use AEDs so that any teacher or student can use them. It's very important to keep it in mind. "

Data analysis details
It is an analysis result of "school accident case search database".

From 2005 to 2020, 8404 cases in which death or disability compensation was paid are listed.

The Japan Sports Promotion Center says that these data can be viewed by anyone as a material for studying measures to prevent the recurrence of accidents. I hope they will be used at school sites.

Cases of death are on the decline
The details of the data.

Of the 8404 cases, 1556 children died during the 16 years from 2005 to 2020.

Let's take a closer look.

<By year (application for condolence money)>

Among the published data, there is a tendency for the number to decrease to
134 in 2005,
119 in 2006,
125 in 2007,
123 in 2008,
114 in 2009, and 115 in 2010.
increase.

▽ Increased to 137 in 2011, but decreased again
▽ 81 in 2012 ▽
85 in 2013 ▽
76 in 2014 ▽
83 in 2015 ▽
78 in 2016
▽ 77 in 2017
▽ 82 people in 2018 ▽
69 people in 2019
▽ 58 people in 2020, which is less than half in the last 16 years.

<By school>

High school has the highest number of deaths, accounting for 700 people, nearly half (45.0%) of the total.

Next, 380 junior high schools (24.4%), 272 elementary schools (17.5%), and 97 nursery schools and kindergartens (6.2%) show that the number of fatal accidents increases as the grade goes up.

<By location>

Looking at the places where the accident occurred,
▽ Roads are the most 575 people (37.0%)
▽ Classrooms and nursery rooms are 179 people (11.5%)
▽ Playgrounds, school playgrounds and gardens are 150 people (9.6%)
▽ Gymnasiums and 95 people (6.1%) in the indoor playground
▽ 49 people (3.1%) in the playground and stadium outside the school
▽ 36 people (2.3%) in the corridor
▽ 25 people (1.6%) in the pool ▽ 25 people (1.6%)
in the river )
▽ Toilet 23 people (1.6%)
▽ Sea and lake, swamp and pond 17 people (1.1%)
▽ Mountains and forests including ski resorts 16 people (1.0%)
▽ Gymnasiums outside the school 14 people (0.9%)
▽ Stairs 14 people (0.9%)
▽ Parks and amusement parks 14 people (0.9%)
▽ Veranda Is 12 people (0.8%).

The tendency to have the most roads does not change in elementary and junior high schools, high schools, etc., but in high schools, the second is the playground and school playground, and the third is the gymnasium and indoor playground, so there are opportunities for club activities compared to elementary and junior high schools. It seems that the increase is in the background.

On the other hand, nursery schools and kindergartens are often accompanied by parents to pick them up, and while the proportion of roads is decreasing, nursery rooms and classrooms account for 45 people, accounting for 46% of the total, which is the largest number.

<The cause of death>
The causes of death were
▽ "head trauma" in 472 (30.3%)
▽ "sudden cardiac death" in 267 (17.2%)
▽ "whole body bruise" in 177 (11.4%)
▽ "suffocation" 149 (9.6%)
▽ "Visceral injury" 119 (7.6%)
▽ "Large vascular sudden death" 118 (7.6%)
▽ "Central nervous system sudden death" 105 (6.7%)
▽ " 62 people (4.0%) had "drowning"
▽ 27 people (1.7%) had "heat stroke"
▽ 25 people (1.6%) had "cervical spinal cord injury"
▽ Others ・ The number of unknowns is 30 (1.9%).

<Sudden death by year>

Sudden death due to sudden changes in physical condition accounts for 30% of the cases of death, and there is a tendency for it to decrease.

▽ 45 in 2005 ▽
35 in 2006 ▽
41 in 2007 ▽
35 in 2008 ▽
39 in 2009
▽ 39 in 2010 ▽
38 in 2011 ▽
27 in 2012
▽ 2013 23 people in
2014 ▽ 25 people in 2014 ▽
30 people in 2015
▽ 19 people in 2016
▽ 25 people in 2017 ▽ 25 people
in 2018 ▽ 25 people
in 2019
▽ 19 people in 2020.

<By school>
By school, 178 (36.3%) were in high school, 126 (25.7%) were in junior high school, and 89 (18.2%) were in elementary school, and the rate of sudden death was particularly high in high school and junior high school.

<Occurrence status>
Looking at sudden death by situation, 140 people accounted for about 30% of the "extracurricular instruction" such as club activities such as baseball and athletics, followed by 96 people in "subjects" such as physical education classes.

<Sudden death by place>
In the data of sudden death, there are many cases where the physical condition suddenly changes when the body is moved.

▽ Playgrounds, school yard, and gardens in the school are the most 103 people (21%)
▽ Classrooms and nursery rooms are 95 people (19.4%)
▽ Gymnasiums and indoor playgrounds are 68 people (13.9%)
▽ Roads are 62 people (12.7 %) %)
▽ There were 29 people (5.9%) in the playground and stadium outside the school
▽ 12 people (2.4%) in the pool.

Status of AED usage
Prompt AED treatment is effective in the event of cardiac arrest.

When the words "AED", "defibrillator", and "electric shock" were extracted from the description of the situation before and after the fall, 134 out of 490 people had the description.

Looking at "who" used it,
▽ 102 people (76.1%) seemed to have used AEDs by faculty members and students
▽ 28 people (20.8%) used by paramedics
▽ 1 also used in hospitals There were people.

* For details, please refer to the Japan Sports Promotion Center "School Accident Case Search Database".
0 25 Read More
Law enforcement use of AEDs Jump to new posts
Skaggs Foundation donates 14 AEDs to Holister, MO PD admin 06/13/2022 6:52 PM
KY3 in MO reports Holister Police receive 14 AEDs after two previous saves, will make older AEDs available to other departments.


https://www.ky3.com/2022/02/10/holl...es-grant-purchase-aeds-city-police-cars/

By Madison Horner
Published: Feb. 10, 2022 at 2:00 PM PST

HOLLISTER, Mo. (KY3) - The Hollister Police Department received $22,548.60 from the Skaggs Foundation to purchase automated external defibrillators for the city and police cars.

Hollister Police Chief Preston Schmidt says 14 AED units will be spread throughout every city building and in all patrol vehicles. The city has three AEDs.

“It’s all about availability, we all know they save lives and with the availability, we have the opportunity to possibly help and be there before an ambulance or emergency services get there,” said Chief Schmidt.

With the new equipment, city employees will be able to provide lifesaving care to individuals experiencing sudden cardiac arrest.

“We’ve already started the training process and even before the city received these AEDs city employee staff went through an annual hands-on CPR and now they will go through annual AED training.”

Hollister City Administrator Rick Ziegenfuss says you never know when an emergency will occur. It’s important to be prepared.

”We’ve saved two lives using AEDs,” said Ziegenfuss. “We know they actually work.”

Ziegenfuss says if you’re a city employee, the community assumes you can help in some way.

”People look to you to be a part of the solution and we want our people to feel confident they can do that,” Ziegenfuss said.

”Just know that if you encounter a cardiac emergency, if you see or are close to a city building or if you see a law enforcement officer contact us right away because we will be able to help,” Chief Schmidt said.

Chief Schmidt says the old AED units will be donated to another department in need.
0 27 Read More
School AEDs Jump to new posts
Third grade students help save teacher in cardiac arrest admin 06/13/2022 6:47 PM
https://tribtown.com/2022/05/06/company-presents-aed-awards-to-redding-school-personnel/


Linda Hume has several people she now considers heroes for life.

On Oct. 2, 2020, the Seymour-Redding Elementary School third grade teacher was in her classroom with some students who were waiting to go catch the bus when she collapsed behind her desk.

A student immediately went to get help, and third grade teachers Kylene Steward and Jennifer Alberring went to Hume’s room. They got the kids out of the classroom, contacted the school office, called 911 and called Hume’s husband, Jim.

When administrators Aaron Floyd and Steve Bush realized she wasn’t breathing, CPR initially was administered before Bush grabbed an automated external defibrillator. With the help of school nurse Rhi Chandler, Floyd got the AED hooked up on Hume and shocked her heart twice.

When local police, fire and ambulance personnel arrived at the school, custodians and teachers escorted them to Hume’s classroom to administer aid.

Hume was then taken to Schneck Medical Center in Seymour before being transferred to St. Francis Hospital in Greenwood. She wound up receiving a pacemaker.

“I am so thankful for these people,” Hume said Monday during a special presentation at the school.


That afternoon, Chris Snodgrass, president of LifeLink AED Specialists, and Steven Schloss, channel partner manager for ZOLL, presented Hume with an AED to give to anyone she wanted. She chose the school, so Redding will have three AEDs.

They also gave an Unexpected Hero Award to Floyd and Steward. Plaques also were made for Bush and Chandler, but they weren’t present to receive them. Plus, plaques will be made for Alberring and another third grade teacher, Riley Stuckwisch.

This was all part of ZOLL’s Heroes for Life program, which acknowledges rescuers for their heroism and celebrates survivors of sudden cardiac arrest.

When a survivor agrees to share their ZOLL AED save story, he or she is presented with a device to donate to their charity of choice. This is a way to celebrate survivors and allow them to pay it forward to help another sudden cardiac arrest victim.

By sharing rescue stories, the critical role bystanders play in helping to increase the odds of survival can be emphasized. It also is a way to educate people about the importance of administering high-quality CPR and using an AED to restore a normal heart rhythm.

Hume said she was contacted by Seymour Community School Corp. School Nurse Coordinator Sherry Reinhart about sharing her story.

“At first, I’m like, ‘Do I want to share my story?’” Hume said. “Then I’m thinking when they are giving this back and I can help save someone else’s life, there wasn’t a thought. Yes, I would definitely do that.”

Snodgrass, who takes care of AEDs around Jackson County, said Seymour schools have had AEDs for more than 20 years, and Reinhart regularly ensures they are ready to use.

“She stays on top of this program. Her and I talk, it seems like weekly, to make sure she’s on top of things to make sure pads, batteries, everything is rescue ready every single day,” Snodgrass said. “I would be hard-pressed to walk around any of these schools because there are probably 35 in the Seymour school system and I would say that every one of them would have a green indicator and they are ready to go. She’s that adamant about it.”

Floyd, who is now the school’s principal, said he and Reinhart are constantly making sure they are ready to go.

“We’ve never had any concerns as far as not only access to equipment but just knowing that our equipment is going to be there if we need it,” he said. “We hated that we had to use it, but thank the good Lord it was there, and it certainly was a benefit to us that day.”

Looking back to that day, Hume said she felt perfectly fine and had no symptoms. She suspects it was an electrical problem with her heart.

“I’m very thankful and grateful, very appreciative,” she said of the aid she received. “You think things like this will never happen to you, but you just take it one day at a time, give your family a hug, tell them you love them.”

In late June 2013, Hume’s daughter, Emily, was a seventh-grader when she started showing flu-like symptoms, her body began to crash and she was lifelined to Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health in Indianapolis.

A virus had attacked and weakened her heart, so doctors performed open heart surgery and placed her on a machine temporarily to take over the heart’s function. She was in the intensive care unit for about a month.

Then in December of that year, doctors tried to remove the Berlin heart to see if Emily’s heart was better, but it wasn’t, and she was put at the top of the heart transplant list. In late February 2014, she received a call that a donor heart was available.

After they prepped and sedated Emily for surgery, doctors determined the heart wasn’t going to work. But a second donor heart became available, and on March 21, 2014, she received the transplant.

Emily is now a junior at Indiana University in Bloomington.

“We had testing done to see if it was genetic, and it wasn’t,” Linda said. “I didn’t have the gene that they thought I could have with her.”

Presenting the AED and awards was special for Snodgrass because he had his own heart issue in 2011 and had to have a pacemaker and defibrillator put in. That resulted in him retiring early from the Seymour Fire Department, and he went on to start his own business distributing AEDs.

“Since I’m retired from the fire department, this has just given me that link to stay in public safety and helping people, and it’s awesome when we get to see situations like this,” he said.

This marked his first Heroes for Life presentation, and Snodgrass has three more to do in Columbus because there were three AED saves in the last six weeks.

“This kind of stuff really hits home for me knowing that people are out there and they are willing to step up because we still live in a society where people are scared to get up and do anything, and I don’t want you to be scared because my device may not function right and I may be that guy lying on the ground that needs somebody to put the defib on me,” he said.

Floyd said school personnel are required to get AED and CPR training, but they hope they never have to use it.

“It was the first live use that I’ve ever witnessed or been a part of,” he said of the incident in Hume’s classroom. “We were pretty numb throughout that whole ordeal. You get the value of that device and getting that on and used as quick as possible. When I look back now, there was a lot of emotion attached to it, and you only can just do what you can.”

Fortunately, he said an AED is simple and clear to use, as it gives audible instructions.

“The simplicity of the device was very helpful and just very easy to use. I think a child could do it if they had to,” Floyd said. “There was a ton of different small, little details that all came together that just one error in one of those things could have been a significant impact on things, so you look at just the choreography of things that took place.”
0 27 Read More
International Public AEDs Jump to new posts
Netherlands nears completion of citizen resuscitation call admin 06/13/2022 6:25 PM
Netherlands upgrades public transportation AED system, nearing completion of tying them into a national resuscitation call system for civilian first responders.


https://nieuws.nl/algemeen/20220610/alle-ns-stations-voorzien-van-aed/

All NS stations will be equipped with an AED from this year, according to Prorail and the Dutch Railways. The parties have been busy in recent years to provide the stations with an AED to increase the chance of survival during heart problems. In the first quarter of this year, Station Woerden, the last remaining station without a defibrillator, will also be equipped with an AED.

In total, there are now 575 AEDs at the 400 stations in the Netherlands. The defibrillators at the stations are part of a larger network with AEDs throughout the Netherlands. Prorail still faces one task to ensure that the resuscitation opportunities at the stations are increased: replacing the AEDs at the 50 major stations. There are still often AEDs that are not linked to HartslagNu, which is the national resuscitation call system for civilian first responders.

Need
Every year, about 17,000 people experience cardiac arrest outside the hospital. This can happen in a sports facility or on a sports field, but usually in or around the house. Day and night. CPR within the first 6 minutes and defibrillation with an AED in the event of a shockable heart rhythm disorder offers a 50-70 percent chance of survival. Every minute of subsequent use of an AED reduces the chance of survival by 10 percent. An ambulance takes an average of 8 to 10 minutes to reach the victim. That is why there is a great need for an AED nearby to be available at all times. The AEDs are often arranged by institutions or agencies, but individuals can also buy an AED themselves .

Heart RateNow
Anyone who has completed accredited CPR training can register with HartslagNu. When a report of a cardiac arrest is received via 112, the system calls on civilian emergency workers who are in the vicinity of the victim. They are instructed to perform CPR and retrieve the nearest AED. In this way, the victim quickly receives the right help while the ambulance is on its way. Stations now play an important role in this because they are often centrally located and therefore easy to reach. When the AED is called, the administrator receives a message from the HartslagNu.nl calling system that the AEDmay be used. In 50 percent of the cases, a civilian emergency worker connects the AED before an ambulance employee arrives. This is partly due to the fact that a civilian emergency worker is on site 2.5 minutes faster on average. Every year there are 8,000 resuscitations and more than half of the victims have never had heart problems before.

National coverage
ProRail has a social function and this also includes social involvement. They like to look at what can be improved, not only for the railways and stations, but also for travelers and local residents. That is why, together with NS and the Heart Foundation, they place at least one AED at each station. This increases the chance of survival of people who suffer a cardiac arrest at or around stations. The new AEDs fulfill an extra important function at no less than half of all stations: they cover an AED-free zone in the area. This is an area without a nearby AED available day and night, which is registered with the HartslagNu call system. This expansion therefore has a significant impact.
0 29 Read More
School AEDs Jump to new posts
Waseca HS Coach saved with school AED admin 06/12/2022 6:17 PM
The National Federation of High School Associations reports on Waseca, MN HS save

https://nfhs.org/articles/coach-survives-cardiac-scare-thanks-to-athletic-trainers-aed/


With just 31 seconds left on the scoreboard clock, the Waseca (Minnesota) High School (WHS) football team was on the verge of a season-opening 21-13 victory over Big South Conference rival Saint Peter (Minnesota) High School. With the game in hand, Waseca head coach Brad Wendland walked to the bench to put away his headset, gathering his thoughts before his impending postgame address to his team.

Then, out of nowhere, a massive head rush overwhelmed Waseca’s 16-year-veteran coach as he turned back toward the sideline. Recognizing the intensity but not wanting to draw attention to himself, Wendland figured he would drop to a knee momentarily while his lightheadedness passed, then get back to his players.

“That was the last regular thought I had before I collapsed,” he said. “And my heart stopped for – my best guess is between four and five minutes.”

During those critical minutes, athletic trainers Troy Hoehn and Leah Rutz, along with an emergency-room nurse who came down from the bleachers, worked diligently to save the coach’s life. Hoehn, the supervisor athletic trainer at Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, who also serves as athletic trainer for WHS’ sports teams, was first to arrive at Wendland’s side.

“He was probably 10 feet from me,” Hoehn said. “It was one of those situations where I just kind of looked down the sideline, and all of a sudden, there was somebody on the ground laying face-down. I ran over there and checked his responsiveness, and he wasn’t responding to me at that point, so I rolled him over so we could assess him better.”

Seconds later, Rutz, who works alongside Hoehn at Mayo Clinic as an athletic trainer and handles athletic training duties for Saint Peter, came running from the opposite side of the field.

“As soon as I saw Troy’s fingers go to (Wendland’s) throat to check his pulse, I went across,” she said. “And when I got there, I heard someone say, ‘we need an AED,’ so I went and grabbed that and started getting it ready.”

As Rutz prepared the AED – short for automated external defibrillator – the nurse performed chest compressions. Once the AED was primed with an appropriate charge, Rutz applied the electrode pads to Wendland’s chest and shocked his heart back into rhythm. Shortly after he awoke, an ambulance arrived to take him to Mankato, where he learned that he had suffered sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Unlike a heart attack, which is caused by a blood flow blockage, sudden cardiac arrest is defined by Mayo Clinic as the abrupt loss of heart function typically caused by a failure within the heart’s electrical system and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. The survival rate for people who experience sudden cardiac arrest outside of a hospital is just 10 percent.

Wendland also learned that had it not been for the quick response from Hoehn and Rutz, who were both dealing with SCA for the first time in their respective careers, his cardiac event almost certainly would have featured a tragic ending. Through their knowledge, composure and collaboration with other on-site medical personnel, the flow of oxygen to Wendland’s brain was restored in roughly four minutes, and narrowly avoided the 5-to-10-minute deprivation period that often leads to debilitating health issues, including death.

“I am here today because other people were prepared and other people were heroic,” Wendland said. “If they wouldn’t have been prepared, first of all, maybe I don’t come back. And secondly, if I go any longer without getting oxygen to my brain, maybe I no longer process information as well or I lose different bodily functions and I’m not quite the same as I was before. It could have been a life-changing event for me.”

“I don’t think it truly registered for me,” said Rutz. “I was aware of what was happening, I was acting, but I don’t think it fully dawned on me the skills we were using and what we were doing until I was walking back across the field afterwards. That’s when it hit me. While it was happening, I just went into autopilot.”

Hoehn and Rutz being on the sidelines also meant AEDs were in very close proximity, as both athletic trainers carry one with them at every game. And given the razor-thin margin for error in this case, that proximity was perhaps the most crucial factor in Wendland’s successful revival.

“A lot of our schools will tend to leave (their AEDs) in a shed or in a building off-site or off the field somewhere,” Hoehn said. “(Leah and I) had ours with us and I’m thankful that we keep them in the same place, so she knew to look in my vacuum splint bag. Seconds count in these situations and if we would have had to send somebody to run down to the other end of the field and get it, come back and then apply it, we probably would have been looking at anywhere from three to five minutes, potentially. And that could have changed our whole outcome.”

Wendland spent the next five days in the hospital being evaluated and had virtually no interaction with his players and staff as he underwent approximately 20 different cardiac assessments. Through the testing regimen, he was informed his SCA was the result of mitral annular disjunction (MAD), a condition stemming from a leak in his heart’s mitral valve. Thankfully, MAD can be “fixed” through a fairly common surgical procedure, which Wendland is scheduled to have completed on March 14.

In addition to working on his general health and having a small AED-like device implanted in his chest in case of a future incident, Wendland became incrementally more involved with his team’s preparation in each of the three weeks after his hospital stay. First, he hosted the offensive coaches for a game-planning meeting ahead of their Week 3 matchup with Tri-City United High School, then he attended the game against Fairmont High School and watched from the press box, and then called plays from the press box in Week 5 against Jordan High School.

Though his prescribed recovery still included plenty of rest, Wendland was dogged in his determination to make a full return to coaching – and teaching history at WHS – as soon as possible, not only for himself, but to embody the same message he iterates to his players at practice.

“How can I be the guy who tells kids, ‘you need to handle adversity and this is going to teach you how to do it’ and ‘we’re going to be there for you and you’re going to come out of this a better young man,’ and say all those things and then just sit at home for a month? What kind of an example would I be setting? I can’t do it. I needed to come back; it was healthier. It would have been less healthy for me to sit at home.”

And after completing a successful stress test on the treadmill under the watchful eyes of his doctors, he was given the go-ahead.

“It was great to be back, and how could I not be grateful?” Wendland said. “Many of the students were at the game (when the incident happened) so some of them were a little freaked out, but a lot of them just wanted to give me a hug. But it just felt great to be back. It felt like I was back where I should be.

“I always knew that Waseca was a special place to teach and coach and the response from the community and the school just reinforced that so much.”

Since enduring the cardiac episode that nearly claimed his life, Wendland has made it a point to advocate for CPR training and improved AED accessibility in the workplace, sporting events and other public places. He already has two speaking engagements lined up for the immediate future, including an appearance at the Minnesota Interscholastic Activities Administrators Association Conference in late March and at a 7-on-7 football tournament at Plainview-Elgin-Millville (Minnesota) High School, which tragically lost one of its football players to SCA several years ago.

“I will talk to anyone who wants to talk to me regarding this incident as long as part of the message is, ‘wherever you are, you need to have an AED available. Because I wouldn’t be here without one.’”
0 34 Read More
School AEDs Jump to new posts
Video of ref being saved during HS game in CO admin 06/12/2022 6:05 PM




KUSA reports high school ref saved with HS AED in Lakewood, CO

https://local12.com/news/investigat...askebtball-game-collapse-heart-pacemaker


LAKEWOOD, Colo. (KUSA) - WARNING: This story has a video of a group of people using an AED defibrillator to shock a man back to life, it may be hard to view for some.

The very best connections, start with the heart.

And that has never been more true than for Bear Creek High School's (BCHS) licensed athletic trainer Ashley Cowan and a Colorado high school referee, Harold 'Woody' White.

In a regular-season game between the Heritage and Bear Creek girls' teams, the two met in the most urgent way possible.

White wears a pacemaker for his heart, the batteries were dead. In the middle of the game action in the first half, White's heart stopped and he collapsed on the court.

Cowan raced over and was the first to reach White on the floor.

"It very quickly declined," she said. "He wasn't breathing, we couldn't feel a pulse."

Cowan instructed a BCHS player to grab the AED defibrillator they had on-site, the athletic director called the ambulance and numerous bystanders came to assist White as well. That included one of White's colleagues who was also refereeing the game. He let them know that White had a pacemaker and told them a parent in the stands was a respiratory therapist.

The group administered CPR and attached the AED to White and shocked him in attempts to save his life. White was able eventually to breathe under his own power and was taken to the hospital.

Three weeks later, he returned to Bear Creek High School to thank Cowan. He was also recognized before the start of the BCHS Heritage re-make game (the game was postponed after the incident).

White and Cowan watched the video of the sequence together, as it was captured by an autonomous camera at the top of the gym.

"I'm just very thankfulthe Lord puts you in different places for different reasons at different timesI told my wife that I was in the right place at the right time and I'm alright with that," White said to Cowan after watching the video and shedding tears.



The 9NEWS Sports team of Brian Olson and Scotty Gange shared the emotional moments Cowan and White shared together in the video above.

This is the second time White has had a heart attack while refereeing a game. Fifteen years ago, a very similar thing happened as he was working a men's league game at a church in Denver.

Woody is still recovering with his wife and children, including his four-year-old son at home.
0 29 Read More
What are the risks of having...or NOT having...an AED? Jump to new posts
Wrongful death suit in KY -Failure to deploy at school admin 06/12/2022 6:01 PM
Local 12 TV in Erlanger, KY reports:


https://local12.com/newsletter-dail...us-mike-bowling-steve-hahn-kentucky-ohio


Mangine Lawsuit: Coach didn't know where closest AED was, lawyer says 'he ran right by it'

by Christian Hauser and Stephanie Kuzydym, WKRCMonday, January 31st 2022


Automated external defibrillators or AEDs can save a person’s life who is suffering cardiac arrest.

The device is also a key part of a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of 16-year-old Matthew Mangine Jr.

Local 12 Investigates has reported extensively on Mangine’s death and the lawsuit's allegations regarding emergency action plans as part of our Athletes AT Risk Series.

This story digs into why the family claims the life-saving AEDs were there to save their son’s life, but were never used.

ERLANGER, Ky. (WKRC) - In their sworn deposition testimony, the coaches and athletic trainer at St. Henry say they were trained how to use an AED and knew what the signs were for sudden cardiac arrest in athletes, but the amended complaint in the wrongful death lawsuit says no AED was ever used by St. Henry personnel to try and save Matthew Mangine Jr., despite being nearby.

Mangine Lawsuit: Coach didn't know where closest AED was, lawyer says 'he ran right by it' (WKRC


The lawsuit states the emergency action plan (EAP) did not include all locations of AEDs on St. Henry’s campus.

St. Henry’s EAP listed three AEDs. The lawsuit alleges there were actually five: three in the school, one in the concession stand by the baseball field and one with the athletic trainer, Mike Bowling.

Bowling testified in his sworn deposition that those two extra AEDs weren’t mentioned in the EAP. One of those AEDs was in the new fine arts addition of the school. The Mangine family’s attorney asked if Bowling had access or keys to that addition.

He said not at that time.

Soccer coach Steve Hahn testified he learned during AED training courses that the importance of an AED was “the speed that it could help.”

The complaint says when Matt collapsed, athletic trainer Mike Bowling was on the other side of St. Henry’s campus at the soccer field – and the AED was in his vehicle.

The Mangine attorneys allege the emergency action plan wasn’t updated, so coaches didn’t know there was an AED in the fine arts extension, which was about 50 yards from where Mangine collapsed.

That’s about half the distance of a football field.

Kevin Murphy is an attorney for the Mangine family.

“By the time an AED was applied by EMS, it was far too late,” Murphy said.

The American Heart Association recommends an AED be used within the first three minutes of a cardiac incident and says a person’s survival rate goes down 10 percent every minute an AED isn't used.

In his deposition, Bowling – the athletic trainer – says he never received a phone call that Mangine was down and was never given any indication about the seriousness of the situation.

“Plan like it’s going to happen that night, rehearse like it’s going to happen during the season so you can be prepared to know exactly what to do because these children are in your hands,” Murphy said.

An emergency response plan is required by Kentucky state law.
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Sturgis man saved with AED he had earlier helped donate admin 06/12/2022 5:45 PM
Another man was saved by law enforcement AED that he helped to provide in an earlier donation!

KOYATV reports:

https://www.kotatv.com/2022/04/14/sturgis-pd-saves-life-with-help-aed-donation/

STURGIS, S.D. (KOTA) - ”I was pretty panicked,” recalled Steven Denton, upon waking up in the hospital.

63-year old Denton was lying in bed around one in the morning, when he experienced chest pains. He thought it was indigestion.

“As my wife told me, I woke up in the middle of the night and sat up straight in bed and said something. She knew something was wrong right away.”

“I came out of the bathroom and said ‘honey’ and he didn’t answer me, and I turned on the light and knew right away,” says Margaret Denton, Steven’s wife. “So, I grabbed the phone, dialed 911, and started chest compressions on him.”

Steven was suffering a heart attack, and had fallen unconscious.

Sgt. Dylan Siscoe with the Sturgis Police Department was the first on the scene.

He arrived with an Automated External Defibrillator, or AED, that every patrol car has.

“I set up the AED, the scan had advised a shock immediately, and then advised to start CPR,” Siscoe said. “So, we were able to get him on the floor and start compressions until the ambulance got there.”

The AED that was used, was donated to the Sturgis PD by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, which donated 1,200 of the devices to emergency departments across South Dakota.

Walter Panzirer is a trustee with the organization, who used to serve, ironically in the Sturgis Police Department.

He says he has first-hand knowledge of how medical equipment in the hands of law enforcement, can help victims survive.

“It’s the police department that’s usually on scene first, and if they have these devices that they can use on a patient who is having cardiac arrest, it gives them a much better chance of resuscitation, that waiting sometimes up to 15 minutes for the paramedics or the ambulance.”

Denton was taken to Monument Health Hospital in Sturgis where he was told what had happened. He thanks all the first responders who helped save his life that night.

“Id like to thank all the officers, my wife, and all the doctors for the medical help I’m getting,” Steven said.

In the next few weeks, Steven and Margret plan to meet with the officers who were first on the scene

“I honestly think all the officers there were working together, and we would have done it for any family, but to have a success story, and meet them afterwards is pretty special,” Siscoe said.
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International Public AEDs Jump to new posts
Mangaluru, India airport now has AEDs admin 06/12/2022 5:39 PM
Mangaluru International Airport (MIA) celebrated World Health Day with the initiation of eight automated external defibrillators (AED) at vantage locations across the airport. The AED machine is not just an important but essential life saving device....

Read more at: https://www.deccanherald.com/state/...nal-airport-installs-8-aeds-1099366.html
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KY man donates for Sheriff AEDs - saved by one of them in Jan. admin 06/11/2022 7:34 PM
Cox media group reports on KY man who helped donate for Sheriff AEDs saved within a year by one of those AEDs!

https://www.kiro7.com/news/trending...saved-by-aed/INP443NJCVEBRA2SNVGGJJ7OTQ/

By Bob D'Angelo, Cox Media Group National Content Desk
February 27, 2022 at 7:30 am PST

MURRAY, Ky. — A Kentucky man donated money last year to help the sheriff’s department buy AEDs to save lives. It turned out that one life that was saved was his own.

Mike Mitchell, of Almo, was one of the first businessmen to donate money to the Calloway County Sheriff’s Office for the purpose of buying three automated external defibrillators (AEDs), WPSD-TV reported. The sheriff’s office now has 20.

Mitchell collapsed on Jan. 18 in his kitchen, and a defibrillator saved his life, as deputies carry one in their patrol cars, the television station reported.


“So much gratitude,” Mitchell, who owns Mitchell’s Towing, told WPSD. “There’s no way to repay them for that. I can say thank you but it’s, yeah, it was pretty traumatic.”

Calloway County 911 Dispatcher Dan Galloway received a call from Whitney Mitchell, reporting that her husband had collapsed and was unresponsive, the West Kentucky Star reported.

Galloway instructed Whitney Mitchell in CPR and dispatched an ambulance to the home, according to the newspaper.

“I was terrified,” Whitney Mitchell told WPSD. “Never seen anything like that happen before.”

Deputy Richard Steen used the AED -- a portable medical device designed to analyze heart rhythms and deliver an electric shock to victims -- to return Mike Mitchell’s heart rhythms to normal, the television station reported.

Mike Mitchell was taken to an area hospital and is recovering at his home, WPSD reported.

”The quickness of everyone involved was key to saving Mr. Mitchell’s life,” Calloway County Sheriff Nicky Knight told the television station. “Also key was the fact that our patrol vehicle had an AED available. I’m so thankful Mr. Mitchell’s donation came full circle and he is recovering from his cardiac event.”
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
2020 Montana school AED law has saved 3 of 4 already admin 06/11/2022 4:29 PM
NBC Montana reports school AEDs required since 2020 have saved three of the four cardiac arrests in schools already.

https://nbcmontana.com/news/local/advocates-praise-2020-mt-law-mandating-aeds-in-school

MISSOULA, Mont. — A simple device that could save lives is missing from many places that need it most.

The state of Montana released the following statistics: In four recent cardiac arrests, one each in Missoula, Kalispell, Townsend and Park City, each location had an automated external defibrillator, and three people survived.

Experts say that shows why AEDs and CPR training are critical.

Montana does not require CPR training

“When somebody goes into cardiac arrest, if they receive CPR from a bystander right away, the chances of survival increase from 10% to 30%. And if the bystander can run and get a defibrillator and use it even before EMS arrives, the chances of survival are about 50%,” said Mary Newman, the president and CEO of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

Montana’s health officials ask schools to register their AEDs with the state. We’re told that doesn’t always happen. But in four western Montana counties, a total of 20 districts registered at least one.
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Indiana Trooper saves man with AED admin 06/11/2022 4:22 PM
Click link below for body-cam footage of save

https://www.abc57.com/news/video-re...ooper-who-saved-a-man-s-life-with-an-aed




WLWT reports Indiana trooper saves man with AED during an accident investigation

https://www.wlwt.com/article/indian...ous-during-crash-investigation/38627099#

A trooper is being praised for his quick action during a crash investigation.

It happened on Sunday when a routine traffic crash investigation took an unexpected turn for an Indiana State Trooper when the man he was talking to fell to the ground unconscious.

Smith was explaining the crash paperwork when the 60-year-old driver grabbed his chest and fell to the ground unconscious.

Smith then rushed to his police car and grabbed his Automated External Defibrillator (AED). When Smith attached the pads of the AED to the man, the AED advised that a shock was needed.

After delivering the shock, Smith began chest compressions. After several compressions, the man regained consciousness and began to talk. Responding paramedics praised Smith’s quick action before transporting the man to a local hospital.
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Sweden adopts drone AED delivery admin 06/08/2022 4:20 PM


As far as UAV flights go, this one supremely qualifies as beyond visual line of sight. Last month, Swedish specialized drone services company Everdrone successfully controlled the delivery of an automated external defibrillator (AED) from a distance of 800 kilometers away – and an entirely different country.

The 1.6 km drone delivery of an AED flew a five-minute route in Helsinki, Finland, but was controlled by Everdrone technicians in Gothenburg, Sweden. The mission was the first UAV delivery of an AED piloted from a different country, and one of the few de facto cross-border drone operations in the European Union. Several successive variations of AED deliveries to other destinations around Helsinki were orchestrated from the Gothenburg command center – but by then, everyone involved had been there, done that, and drank the Champagne. Still, it’s a big deal.

Everdrone, which focuses on serving first responder and public safety clients, has made drone delivery of AEDs a priority. It already operates a total of seven UAVs dedicated to that function in four Swedish cities, with a fifth city to be added soon. The craft fly those emergency missions several times each week.

The company’s tests in Helsinki were an extension of that work in a country that can sorely use the help. Between 5,000 and 10,000 people die from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Finland every year. Research has shown the chance of survival of people suffering heart attacks in remote places decreases 10% each minute after the onset of arrest. Studies in Sweden have demonstrated using drones to deliver AEDs in those situations is generally faster – sometimes much faster­­– than traditional ground options.

The cross-border tests were undertaken in partnership with Forum Virium Helsinki, which endeavors to speed innovation and development of the Finnish capital as a smart digital and sustainable city.

According to Daniel Blecher, Everdrone’s ground operations manager, the communications and navigation tech are now so solid and familiar that the only tricky element of the tests was navigating the European Union’s administrative process to get clearance for cross-border BVLOS flights.

Once that was in hand, and the drones were ready to fly, LTE cellular connections eliminated latency between the pilot and delivery drone. Those UAVs, meanwhile, autonomously flew pre-established paths. The human monitor was required to visually check the drop target was clear and manually order the lowering of the AED. The only other thing the Gothenburg team had to do was keep Helsinki air controllers and local partners informed of the UAV’s progress.

“With a safety operator on-site monitoring the operations in Helsinki, a number of missions were carried out during the (trials) in which an autonomous drone flew to the scene of a simulated emergency and lowered an AED to the ground using a winch system, before flying back to the launch location,” Blecher explained. “The missions were performed over a simulation of a residential area in order to showcase the intelligent route planning and autonomous flying capabilities of the drone.”

With the unprecedented cross-border AED drone delivery challenge in the bag, Everdrone says it’s now looking to equip the UAVs used with position lights and LED front beams to enable night flights.
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Dramatic video of Loudon deputy saving woman admin 06/07/2022 6:16 PM
WBIR reports a woman was saved with her husband's CPR and a deputy with an AED arrived within a minute to provide the shock she needed to restart her heart. The entire department only has three AEDs so the deputy was in the right place at the right time. Now they are working on ways to deploy more. Click the link below for body cam footage.


https://www.wbir.com/article/news/c.../51-472636dd-8d97-44fa-aa51-32a2e3052abd

Author: Cole Sullivan
Published: 6:44 PM EST December 7, 2021
Updated: 6:44 PM EST December 7, 2021


LOUDON COUNTY, Tenn. — It was a combination of luck and training that put Loudon County deputy Mark Rodriguez at the right place at the right time to save a life.

In the wee hours of last Tuesday morning, he responded to a medical call from a man whose wife of nearly 39 years became unconscious while he was driving her to the emergency room, the sheriff's office said.

Rodriguez was on scene within a minute, he said, but that was not the only stroke of luck.

"If I didn't have that AED," he said. "There's no telling what would have happened."

That night, Rodriguez had one of the sheriff's office's three automated external defibrillators in his patrol car. Upon arriving, he helped pull the unconscious woman from her car and instructed her husband to continue CPR as he prepared the device designed to shock the heart back into rhythm.

"I checked for a pulse in her neck and it was nothing. Her eyes were open, I mean she was not breathing. She was flatlined. So I knew okay we got to get this AED on. The AED talks to you, it tells you exactly what to do," he recalled.

It was Rodriguez's first time using the device, but a video from the incident shows him applying the pads to the woman's chest without hesitation.

"I hit the lightning button and it was a shock and immediately you could hear her. It was a struggle breathing, but she was breathing," he said.

By the time she arrived at the hospital, Rodriguez said she was alert and conscious. Her husband credits Rodriguez's quick actions with saving her life.

"I don't know how she would have made it until the paramedics got there," he said.

Now the department wants to expand its AED program and purchase more devices so more officers can carry them in their patrol cars.

"If Deputy Rodriguez had been on a call on the other end of that [patrol] zone, that equipment wouldn’t have been available," Chief Deputy Jimmy Davis said. "Our goal is for every car for every patrol car to have an AED available."

He asked for the community to help pitch in with the funding for the new devices so more deputies like Mark Rodriguez can save lives.

"I did what I had to do. I did what I trained to do. I did what I signed up for," Rodriguez said. "Ultimately, the blessing is that she gets to spend the holidays with her family."
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