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The business end ...AED product news Jump to new posts
HeartHero has CE label, close to market! admin 06/08/2021 10:34 PM
Link to HeartHero coverage on Fox21 in Colorado



COLORADO– A Marine Corps veteran and former CIA Medical Officer has created a mini, low-cost, Automated External Defibrillator (AED) to help empower anyone, anywhere to save a life.

Gary Montague is the founder and CEO of Denver-based HeartHero and the creator of “Elliot”.

Elliot can be used on both adults and children younger than 8 years old or who weigh less than 55 pounds.

It was during a CIA operation, that Montague experienced the need for a highly portable and robust AED firsthand.

“I really wanted it for my backpack when I was in the military and CIA operations, but as I did more research I realized that the 70% were affected in the homes for cardiac arrest. We need to move the AED there – no longer should it sit on a wall in a government building,” said Montague.

“It needs to be by your side – in your purse – in your backpack – next to your loved one that you care about the most,” said Montague.

The company, HeartHero, says when an AED shock is delivered within three minutes of a cardiac arrest, the chance of survival is higher than 70%. However, in the time that it takes for emergency medical services to arrive with an AED, it’s often too late.

The Elliot weights only 1.3 lbs and it’s high tech.

The device will not shock a person if it isn’t needed, making HeartHero safe to use if you are not sure whether a person is experiencing sudden cardiac arrest.

Elliot is fully functional on it’s own but also has an app that can be paired to bring the AED to life.

When in use, Elliot can also auto notify emergency services, a feature designed to shorten response times and to further strengthen the chance of survival.

Elliot is multilingual and will deliver step-by-step voice instructions with clear visual prompts to guide users calmly and confidently through crisis.

The voice of Elliot is a 5x sudden cardiac arrest survivor, Carrie Romero.

In the testing process, Montague says children as young as six years old can safely operate the device.

HeartHero has received its CE Mark, officially readying it for deployment in the fight against sudden cardiac death.

“I don’t want us to be bystanders, I want us to be TRY-standers – I want us to act and do something. If your loved one is on the ground in front of you – it might be one of the scariest moments of your life. With this device you have a chance to have another birthday, another anniversary… for them to watch their grandkids grow up – this is the impact I want to make,” said Montague.

>>To follow HeartHero and stay up to date on this product’s release, visit their website here.
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Medical facility AEDs Jump to new posts
Redfield First Responders and Fire donate AED to IA clinic admin 06/08/2021 9:57 PM
Link to orig post in Dallas County News



The Redfield Medical Clinic thanks the Redfield First Responders and Fire Department for donating a new Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) to the clinic.

Applied in a timely manner an AED can shock a heart into a normal rhythm after it has gone into a life threatening rhythm. Redfield Emergency Medical Services (EMS) President Obadiah Meyers and Redfield Fire Chief Mike Short secured an EMS grant to fund the donation. Importantly, Redfield EMS will ensure the regular maintenance of the AED.

"This new AED at the clinic will give us the best chance of resuscitating someone who has collapsed due a life threatening heart rhythm before irreversible damage occurs and it is too late to save a life," said Redfield Medical Clinic PA Ed Friedmann. "The Redfield EMS volunteer teams provide invaluable life saving emergency services to our community. We are very lucky to have such dedicated citizens who go above and beyond the call of duty in our town. I thank them for their ongoing essential services and their generous donation to our clinic."
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
Idaho foundation 19th school AED admin 06/08/2021 9:48 PM
Link to orig News8 coverage




IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KXPI/KIFI) - A life-saving device is now in the hallways of another area school thanks to a local nonprofit.

Temple View Elementary School in Idaho Falls is the latest recipient of an AED donated by the nonprofit People Against Impaired Driving or P.A.I.D.

"So exiting for Temple View that this award was presented to us today. It means life-saving equipment that we can use for anyone who may be in our building, whether it's for after school, for programs, or during the day," said principal Sarah Childers.

An AED is an automated external defibrillator. It is usually portable and can automatically diagnose a life-threatening cardiac situation and can shock the heart back into rhythm.

This donation Friday is the 19th AED placed in an area school by P.AI.D. Earlier in the day, the 18th device was donated to Linden Park Elementary School in Idaho Falls.

Pat Tucker, the founder of P.A.I.D., said the 20th device would be donated to Cloverdale Elementary School in Ammon later in the day. Tucker said each AED costs $1,600 and their donations have totaled $34,245 since the organization began.

P.A.I.D. was founded by Tucker in 2006 following the death of her 11-year-old daughter Cady. Cady was killed in a car accident August 15, 2002 when the car she was riding in was hit by a medically-impaired driver in Montana. Since then, Tucker has held fundraisers like the "Cady Tucker Run in the Spirit" to buy the AED devices for schools and raise awareness. The 10th annual run with be held July 17, 2021.

P.A.I.D. was featured as a Pay It Forward Recipient in February 2020, in which Mountain America Credit Union awarded $500. MACU is now one of the sponsors that makes the AED donations possible. Representative Kory Carling presented on behalf of the credit union.
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State and local laws coming over the next 30 days Jump to new posts
Additional info on CT bill to require AEDs in health clubs admin 06/08/2021 9:36 PM
State Senator Will Haskell (D-Westport) and State Representative Aimee Berger-Girvalo (D-Ridgefield) today rallied around legislation they co-introduced aimed at saving lives and preventing further tragedy in the name of their constituents. Senate Bill 110, currently being considered by the Public Health Committee, would require health clubs and athletic facilities to provide and maintain automatic external defibrillators, or AEDs. Sen. Haskell and Rep. Berger-Girvalo introduced the language after meeting Suzanne Bellagamba Brennan.

"Tragically, my husband and father of three suffered a cardiac event in 2012 and died while at a Ridgefield health club," said Brennan. "His chances of survival would have been drastically improved while awaiting help from EMS had an AED device and trained staff been on site. Four years later, another Ridgefield father suffered a near-fatal cardiac event at the same gym. Fortunately, this father survived, largely because of a trained staff person who immediately came to his aid. This staff member was taking a personal training course of his own accord. It is indisputable that the likelihood of sudden cardiac arrest increases in health clubs where people are intentionally raising their heart rates. Recognizing that there is a decrease in fatality rates with the immediate use of an AED and trained staff, this bill will help save lives. I want Connecticut to enact this law, like others already have, to help another family avoid the heartbreaking and unnecessary loss of a loved one."

"Suzanne has faced tragedy and loss. Her advocacy, outreach and desire to help others and save lives is nothing less than extraordinary," said Sen. Haskell. "This legislation sees a serious problem and finds a solution that will save lives if passed. For Suzanne and her family and others who have lost loved ones, or come close to it, we owe it to them to protect the public from this very real problem."

“Suzanne has inspired me, and so many of my colleagues, as she has taken her family’s unimaginable loss, and all that they experienced in the wake of sudden tragedy, and channeled it toward an endeavor that will help save the lives of so many others," said Rep. Berger-Girvalo. "If ever there were an example of the way a single person can bring about real and meaningful change, Suzanne is it. I am proud to stand with Suzanne, and do whatever I can do to help her get this legislation passed.”

Senate Bill 110,"An Act Requiring An Automatic External Defibrillator in Health Clubs and Athletic Facilities," introduced by Sen. Haskell and Rep. Berger-Girvalo, would require health clubs and athletic facilities to have AED devices on site with at least one employee or volunteer qualified in understanding how to use them, additionally limiting liability of health clubs and employees from non-negligent use of AEDs. That employee training could be as simple as an employee watching an informative training video.

In health clubs and athletic facilities, where people are pushing themselves through strenuous exercise and increasing their heart rates, there is a higher risk of cardiac arrest. Studies have shown that risk of death in the event of a cardiac event declines with immediate use of an AED along with CPR, with a 2018 study finding the odds of survival more than double if an AED is on hand. Conversely, chance of survival from cardiac events decreases by up to 10 percent every minute defibrillation is not performed; emergency medical services on average need four to ten minutes to respond to a distress call.

In recent years, AEDs have become increasingly mandated across Connecticut. Public golf courses and schools are among locations now required to have AEDs and trained staff on site. Several other states, including Massachusetts, have enacted similar laws for health clubs and athletic facilities.
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AED and resuscitation research Jump to new posts
Occupational Safety orig article link admin 06/08/2021 8:31 PM
Link to orig article


By Jennifer Dawson

Jan 08, 2021


Every year, more than 350,000 instances of cardiac arrest occur outside U.S. hospitals, according to the American Heart Association. These medical emergencies can occur anywhere from private homes and business premises to public institutions, and even while commuting via car, bus or train. A company’s greatest asset is undoubtedly its employees. This is why employers need to do everything in their power to create a happy and safe working environment. While having an efficient human resources department will undoubtedly contribute towards a constructive workplace, investing in CPR and general first aid training for employees can be equally as beneficial. Indeed, there are numerous benefits to providing emergency training to the workforce.


It’s a Lifesaving Skill

On any given day, approximately 1,000 Americans experience sudden cardiac arrest. According to the latest statistics released by the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation, only 10 percent of these people survive. The most valuable benefit that can be gained from CPR training in the workplace is the fact that precious lives can be saved. An employee who knows how to perform CPR and use an automated external defibrillator (AED) can mean the difference between someone living and dying during a medical emergency. Having someone on-site to perform CPR or use an AED can keep a patient in cardiac arrest alive until professional medical personnel arrives on the scene. An onsite AED can actually turn out to be a great investment, especially if you opt for an affordable and user-friendly model that requires virtually no maintenance.


Fewer Workplace Accidents

Each year, more than 5,000 Americans die from work-related injuries, according to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics. Additionally, injuries in the workplace cost U.S. companies about $62 billion every year. A decrease in workplace accidents is one of the most notable benefits of first aid and CPR training in the workplace. When employees undergo first aid training, they are also equipped with valuable knowledge that will allow them to be more safety-conscious. This increased level of safety awareness will lead to reduced reckless behavior and a greater respect for health and safety protocol. During CPR training, employees will also learn about the possible causes of cardiac arrest and the long-term impact it may have on the body. Although the intention is to educate rather than to instill fear, the automatic response is to avoid such situations at all costs.


CPR Skills Can Be Used Anywhere

CPR training will never be exclusive to the workplace. In fact, training employees to perform CPR and use an AED provides them with a life-long skill that can be used regardless of where they find themselves in life. When they embark on a first aid course, they will also learn a host of other vital techniques, including dealing with fractures, cuts, burns, allergic reactions, insect bites and stings and strains and sprains. All of these skills can be of great value should an emergency situation arise at work, at home or in public. Even if an employee does not show a keen interest in acquiring even rudimental first aid skills, they will undoubtedly be glad they have them once an emergency situation arises. CPR abilities can also be utilized anywhere in the world, making it a very handy skill to have for employees traveling for both business and leisurely purposes.

Creates a More Positive Working Environment

Every working environment, whether it is an industrial workshop or a medium-sized office, has the potential to be the setting of a medical emergency. Creating a safe working environment can benefit both the organization and employees in numerous ways. Staff members that are permanently stressed out about potential medical concerns may find it increasingly difficult to concentrate on their tasks. However, just knowing there are trained staff members on standby to perform potentially life-saving first aid does wonders for staff morale, which in turn boosts productivity as well.



Patients Recover Faster

The sooner CPR is administered after cardiac arrest sets in, the greater chance the patient has to recover. If a patient receives CPR immediately after going into cardiac arrest, chances of survival increases exponentially, while the toll the trauma takes on the body is also considerably less. The longer a patient remains in cardiac arrest, the greater the risk of permanent damage to vital organs is. In order for the tissues in the body to stay alive, oxygen-rich blood needs to be circulated through the body. Approximately four minutes after blood flow stops, the brain can become damaged. Irreversible damage can occur when there has been no blood flow for more than seven minutes. In order to give a patient the best possible chance at recovery, CPR has to be commenced within four minutes of a person going into cardiac arrest. Having someone in the workplace that can perform CPR makes this possible.


Employees Feel Valued

Employees who feel valued by their employers will be considerably more willing to give their best to the organization than those who feel unappreciated. In fact, feeling underappreciated is one of the top reasons employees want to resign from their jobs, according to Business Insider. Thankfully, there are many ways in which an employer can show their appreciation for their workforce. One of the most effective ways is by making the health and wellbeing of the staff a priority. By providing first aid and CPR training to staff, an organization shows that it cares about the wellbeing of its employees. Apart from employees feeling valued, the organization itself can also benefit from being proactive in terms of first aid training. It will, for instance, earn a good reputation among customers, investors and the general public for its hands-on approach to corporate responsibility.
CPR is a valuable skill to have in the workplace. Even if the need to use it never arises, it will put the minds of the workforce at ease to know that there is someone nearby who can perform potentially lifesaving first aid.
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What are the risks of having...or NOT having...an AED? Jump to new posts
KY lawsuit over failure to provide AED at HS admin 06/08/2021 8:16 PM
UBLawsSports forum orig article



Commonality of Wrongful Death Suits in High School Athletics

High school sports are paramount to many teenagers and can be a great way for students to get exercise, learn valuable life skills, and build friendships. However, if these high school student athletes are pushed too hard or are placed in risky situations, the results can quite literally be deadly.

On Tuesday, June 11, 2020, 16-year-old Matt Mangine Jr. of St. Henry District High School in Kentucky collapsed at a soccer training session and never recovered. The coroner’s report stated that following a conditioning session where the temperature was around 80 degrees, Mangine fell to his knees, collapsed to the turf and was gasping for air. The 16-year-old apparently had a history of exercise-induced asthma and an episode of syncope, or fainting, during soccer practice two to three years ago. The original complaint at the time of his death was cardiac arrest, but an autopsy by a medical examiner ruled the cause of death “undetermined.”

However, five months after Matt’s death, his family is filing a wrongful death suit against St. Henry District High School, the Diocese of Covington and St. Elizabeth, who employed the athletic trainer. Kentucky Statutes section 411.130 defines a “wrongful death” as “the death of a person (that) results from an injury inflicted by the negligence or wrongful act of another.” In Kentucky, a wrongful death case must establish that:

The death was caused by another individual’s or entity’s neglect, default, misconduct or wrongful act;
The deceased individual has surviving dependents or beneficiaries, such as a spouse or children; and
These surviving family members have experienced measurable monetary injury as a result of the wrongful death

The Mangine family complaint specifically alleges that St. Henry failed to properly plan for first practices of the season after an extended layoff, failed to comply with the school’s Emergency Action Plan (EAP), failed to timely locate a defibrillator (AED), failed to utilize an AED and failed to comply with applicable standards of care.

While Kentucky law does not require AEDs for athletics, the Kentucky High School Athletic Association (KHSAA) requires AEDs to be accessible within three minutes of any practice or game. St. Henry’s apparently had three AEDs on its property, but the lawsuit claims that one was not on site at the practice and no one brought one to be used on Mangine.

According to the American Heart Association, the goal of every AED program is to deliver defibrillation to a sudden cardiac arrest victim within three to five minutes after collapse. Dr. Samantha Scarneo-Miller, an athletic emergency medical response expert at West Virginia University reported that if an AED is used within three minutes of collapse, the chance of that person’s survival is 90%. The lawsuit stated that Matt Mangine Jr. collapsed at 7:12 p.m. and it was only after paramedics arrived that they applied an AED at 7:24 p.m. That’s 12 minutes. “For every one minute that that’s delayed, you reduce your chance for survival by 10%,” said Dr. Riana Pryor, an athletic environmental impact expert at the University of Buffalo.

The family is seeking damages for gross negligence, wanton and reckless disregard and loss of affection and companionship, since Mangine was a minor.

Unfortunately, Matt Mangine’s death and subsequent lawsuit is not a rarity. While Mangine’s death was deemed “undetermined,” most, if not all, of the wrongful death lawsuits allege the same thing: someone or something was negligent and violated a duty of care to the student athlete. Back in September 2017, a $15 million wrongful death lawsuit was filed in New York asserting that football coaches violated their duties of proper technique instruction, safe playing environment and supervision, in a situation where a 400-pound log being carried by high school players during a preseason football camp, in a simulation of a drill used in military special forces training, fell on one of the player’s head, killing him.

As shocking as this example is, this does seem to be an extreme example. Sudden cardiac arrest and heat stroke appear to be the leading cause of all sport-related deaths. A recent study found that more than 50 high school athletes died from sudden cardiac arrest during the two-year period studied, with football and basketball being the two most deadly sports. Yet the majority of states do not require schools to have on-site AEDs at athletic events, as demonstrated by Kentucky and Mangine’s death. From a legal standpoint, when an AED makes the difference between life and death (and therefore potential wrongful death lawsuits), you should certainly protect yourself from liability by having that AED at any and all sporting events.
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Law enforcement use of AEDs Jump to new posts
HRSA grant provides AEDs for MI rural law enforcement admin 06/08/2021 6:56 PM
Link to orig Herald newspaper coverage



MECOSTA, OSCEOLA, LAKE COUNTIES — The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office would like to give a huge shoutout to Michigan Rural EMS Network and Mecosta County EMS who Worked together to place AEDs in Mecosta, Lake and Osceola Counties.

Michigan Rural EMS Network (MiREMS) recently donated twelve automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) to agencies in Mecosta, Lake and Osceola Counties.

Mecosta County EMS collaborated with MiREMS to facilitate placement of AEDs in the following locations; six to the Osceola County Sheriff’s Department, three to Evart Schools, one in a rural physician office in Tustin, one at Evergreen Physical Therapy in Big Rapids and one at Edgetts Wesleyan Church in Luther.

"Jenny Edstrom, who works for Mecosta County EMS and is the wife of an Osceola County deputy took the lead on this project for us and delivered. As an organization we are now much stronger to provide better medical services to our citizens while out on patrol," an Osceola County Sheriff's department spokesperson said.

The donation was made in response to a request from Osceola County Sheriff Department and Mecosta County EMS, who recognized the need for additional AEDs in the community but found it difficult to secure the needed funding for the equipment.

The donated AEDs were the last remaining of more than 200 that were purchased by Michigan Rural EMS Network with grant funds from the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, Health Resources Services Administration, and placed in several rural counties across Michigan.

Since 2016 many first responders in the area have been trained in High-Performance CPR, which has been proven to dramatically improve patient survival in the event of cardiac arrest.

Community members have also received training in CPR and the use of AEDS.

The High-Performance CPR training and AED placements were a part of the Network’s MiResCu (Michigan Resuscitation Consortium) program. The initiative is part of a system of strategies that have been proven to increase cardiac arrest survival, and is based on the system pioneered in Seattle/King County, Washington, which is among the highest reported survival rates in the world for witnessed ventricular-fibrillation.

Michigan Rural EMS Network in a nonprofit organization which provides support for rural first responders and agencies for which they work.

MiREMS largely relies on grants and donations to provide programs to benefit first responders and the rural Michigan communities they serve.

For more information, please contact MiREMS at (989) 272-3200 or info@mirems.org.

HRSA Rural AED Grant: Federal funding provided 100% of program costs, or $150,000 per year.
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Law enforcement use of AEDs Jump to new posts
Greenville, SC police deploys 127 AEDs admin 06/08/2021 6:52 PM
Link to orig WSPA coverage




by: Ayla Ferrone

Posted: Nov 5, 2020 / 02:54 PM EST / Updated: Nov 5, 2020 / 05:47 PM EST

GREENVILLE, S.C. (WSPA)–The Greenville Police Department is now equipped with more than just your average tool belt. Now in patrol cars they’ll actually have equipment that can save your life.

It’s called an Automated External Defibrillator, or an AED. And now patrol cars in the City of Greenville will have them on hand for emergencies.

“The purpose of it is to give us the opportunity to give life saving treatment before people with more training can come to help,” Officer Nathan Stanton said.

Officer Stanton showed 7News how the machine works, and said he’s already had to use it.

“Thankfully she regained consciousness and was starting to be able to talk a little bit. So we didn’t give a shock with the AED or start CPR,” Stanton said.

Stanton was able to make it to that scene quicker than others who were dispatched.

“When I used my AED I happened to be right next door on a call already and that meant that I was there four or five minutes before EMS were able to get there,” Stanton said.

Which is why it’s so important to have this new equipment.

“Because every second counts, the person who can get there the fastest is the best person to start helping with that job whether it’s an officer, a firefighter, or an EMT,” Stanton said.

Chief Howie Thompson agrees.

“And so they’re usually very close by when this happens and they’re able to get there quick and start helping people,” Thompson said.

He said each machine cost about $1500, but said it’s well worth it.

“The cost of a life, you can’t put a price tag on that. While it was expensive to outfit this number of cars it will be money well spent,” Thompson said.

Greenville Police Officers also have elevated first aid kits to help with trauma. Officer Stanton says with this emergency equipment with him he feels more equipped to protect the people of Greenville.

“This gives us the tools we need to act and help protect the citizens of Greenville,” Stanton said.

There are 127 of these kits and they are currently in 114 patrol cars. The other 13 AED machines are in buildings or training facilities where the Greenville Police Department frequents.
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AEDs at home Jump to new posts
PulsePoint and Priority dispatch team up to provide closest AED admin 06/08/2021 6:26 PM
Link to origional JEMS article



Emergency medical dispatchers across North America can now quickly direct 911 callers during time-critical cardiac emergencies to the closest automated external defibrillator (AED), thanks to the implementation of an AED geolocation plan by Priority Dispatch and the PulsePoint Foundation.


The partnership between Priority Dispatch and PulsePoint allows 911 dispatchers to inform callers of the location of AEDs while using existing medical dispatch protocols within Priority Dispatch’s ProQA® software, with no changes to workflow–saving critical time during life-threatening emergencies.

Each year in the U.S., there are approximately 360,000 Emergency Medical Services (EMS)-assessed cardiac arrests outside of a hospital and on average, less than 10 percent of victims survive. The keys to survival are early recognition, early CPR and early defibrillation.


Action taken by bystanders prior to the arrival of EMS results in victims being two to three times more likely to survive.

Anyone can add an AED location to the public registry by downloading the PulsePoint AED app or by simply visiting the website aed.new. The AEDs are vetted by local authorities before they are shared with dispatchers or users of PulsePoint Respond, the companion app to PulsePoint AED.

The partnership means dispatchers can now tell the caller the exact location of the AED–rather than ask if there’s a known AED nearby, as they had to in the past. One of the early adopters of the protocol and technology is Manatee County, Fla., Emergency Communications Center.

“The combination of ProQA and PulsePoint puts our dispatchers in a great position to guide bystander response to sudden cardiac arrest,” said Josh Ingle, Administrative Specialist with Manatee County’s ECC. “This really empowers our dispatchers and citizens to make a difference.”
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AED and resuscitation research Jump to new posts
Canada studies the use of drones to deliver AEDs. admin 06/08/2021 5:56 PM
Canada studies drones for AED scene delivery


JULY 13, 2020

DDC Completes Phase Two of AED Tests
BY RENEE KNIGHT


During a cardiac arrest, time is critical. Victims need immediate medical attention, but if they’re in a remote location, it may be too late by the time the ambulance arrives. Sending a drone with an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) ahead of the ambulance gets help to the scene faster, and that could save lives.

Through the On The Fly Project, Drone Delivery Canada (DDC) is deploying its Sparrow UAS in simulated situations to see how it can reduce response times. The company, working with Peel Region Paramedics and Sunnybrook Centre for Prehospital Medicine, recently completed phase two of the study.

During phase 1, which concluded about a year ago, the goal was to prove a drone could arrive on-scene before the ambulance, allowing a bystander to begin using the AED, DDC President and CEO Michael Zahra said. The team set up a DroneSpot at an EMS station in a rural area, with the Sparrow being dispatched following mock 911 calls. The drone demonstrated it could beat the ambulance to the scene, showing how it can be beneficial in emergency situations, particularly in rural communities.

Phase two, which was completed last month, was more about human interaction during a simulated stressful situation, Zahra said. At DDC’s test range, lay people walking at three separate locations made simulated 911 calls after discovering a mannequin representing a cardiac arrest patient.

Once the operator took all the relevant information, the Sparrow flew to the scene. On arrival, the drone reduced altitude to drop the AED, with an alarm signaling the drop. In phase 1, the drone had to land to deliver the AED, which took a little more time.

“We wanted to see the human factor of how somebody responds to a drone approaching them in the field and the siren sounding as the drone gets ready to drop the defibrillator,” Zahra said. “We wanted to see how they interfaced with the drone and dispatch.”

A cell phone was attached to the AED, Zahra said, with directions on how to FaceTime with an operator, who provided guidance on using the defibrillator. The bystanders had to retrieve the AED once it was dropped, open the package and give the initial shock. The entire process, from call to shock, took about 4 minutes, but that time will vary depending on how far the drone is from the scene. In this case is was about a kilometer.

“Phase two of our research was truly a success. Our previous research within our rural community suggested the need to optimize the simplicity of AED use once delivered by a drone to the site of a cardiac arrest,” said Dr. Sheldon Cheskes, associate professor at the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto and the program’s principal investigator, in a news release. “Today we were able to markedly improve the speed of drone descent, the ability to accurately drop a protected AED from a drone at a safe height but most importantly see first-hand the benefits of technology that guides the first responder through the application of an AED after being released by the drone in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario.”

These factors, he said, “strengthen the likelihood that not only may drones decrease time to first AED shock in rural and remote communities but the fear of AED use can be minimized by real-time interaction between a first responder and trained personnel demystifying the use of AEDs during cardiac arrest.”

Zahra expects phase three of the project to be completed later this year or next spring. That round of testing will likely include multiple predetermined locations in a rural town. As mock 911 calls come in from one of these remote locations, of which there could be tens or hundreds, the Sparrow will deploy with the AED and then lower and drop the cargo once arriving on scene.

Zahra sees the Sparrow being used to carry other emergency aid—such as EpiPens, insulin pens and snake bite kits—that can be quickly delivered to people in remote locations. While it’s difficult to say when these types of deliveries might become mainstream, such services will likely be rolled out in phases. One community will start using drones in this way, expand the project, and then other communities will start doing the same. This phased deployment could happen as early as next year. National parks are among the areas that could benefit from such deliveries, whether the drone is carrying AEDs or other emergency aid.
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I need an AED but need help with funding Jump to new posts
OH village uses Workman Comp funds for AEDs admin 06/08/2021 5:44 PM
SOUTH POINT — State officials are commending South Point for its use of its portion of the $5 billion dividend it received from the Ohio Bureau of Workers Comp.

The village used the funds to purchase automatic external defibrillators for its fire, police and village workers.

The devices allow for the diagnosis of someone having cardiac arrest or other issues and allow treatment through the use of electronic defibrillation.

The device will be in each of South Point’s police cruisers, in two of its fire trucks and there will one at village hall and the sewer plant.

“This is one-time money that we can’t use for salaries, so we decided to put it toward public safety,” Mayor Jeff Gaskin said.

Roger Hoback, BWC Industrial safety consultant specialist wrote about the village in a lengthy post on the agency’s blog.

“Working with employers like South Point Village is the most rewarding part of my job,” he said. “With all their efforts, there is no question that the safety and health of the village’s employees, first responders, and citizens is top priority.”

Gaskin said the village was honored that BWC decided to do an article on the funds and that officials from the agency would be at a council meeting later this year to discuss the subject further.

In other news, Gaskin said renovations on the village’s community center are “very much on schedule.”

“We should do drywall this week and be ready to paint next week,” he said.

The village received a $200,000 grant from the Ohio Legislature for the work and Gaskin said this will include new handicapped-accessible restrooms, a new HVAC system, new storage and new electrical service.

He said the building only had about four outlets before the work, but now it will have 18 double outlets, which will have USB chargers for devices.

“We modernized the building,” he said, pointing out that this had not been done since it was built in the 1970s. “It will be a good venue to have receptions and will have a capacity of about 100.”

Gaskin said that this week is the village’s clean-up week, which takes place twice a year, as well as its monthly brush week.
“So our village employees are working very hard,” he said.

South Point’s village council will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday.
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
Little Rock 16 year lol BB player saved with school AED admin 06/08/2021 5:30 PM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (WKRC) - This is the story of an unlikely event that's more common than you might think.“Everything was just a normal Tuesday night.” That’s eStem Mets boy’s basketball coach Nathan Pottorff. He’s in his seventh year as a head coach, but his first with eStem.

On that Tuesday night in December during a boy’s basketball game in Little Rock, Arkansas, 16-year-old Cobe Isaac came off the bench into the varsity game.

“This is his first year playing varsity basketball, so he was excited and playing hard,” Pottorff said.The Mets were running a baseline out of bounds play. Isaac hit the court.

“My first thought was he probably took an elbow or something” Pottorff said. A nurse practitioner from the Arkansas Heart Hospital was at the game and she and Little Rock Christian's team, including its athletic trainer and its director of facilities, raced to Isaac's side.He didn't have a pulse. “(The nurse practitioner) said, ‘We rarely stay for boys’ games, but my daughter wanted to stay that night and we stayed.’” Pottorff said.


Within a minute, Little Rock Christian says they used a defibrillator, commonly known as an AED. The device's batteries had just been changed before the game.“It was just a matter of an hour,” said Eric Schmidt, Little Rock’s director of facilities. “When you put all those things together, it’s like terrible that it happened but it’s like God meant for it to happen at that time because he knew everything would be taken care of,” Pottorff said. Little Rock Christian said what they learned from the situation is that they actually need another AED. It will be their fourth.


“You hear stories about it,” Pottorff said, “but as a coach you’re kind of naïve like yeah I’m ready for it but it’s not going to happen to me.“But that night it happened to me.” For the last decade, an Arkansas law requires schools to have an AED and train staff in its use. It’s all because of a similar situation that took place in 2008, on a high school basketball court. Anthony Hobbs III collapsed and died. The law is named in his honor.

“We’ve all sat in the same room and watched those same videos and you’re like this is the extreme of the extreme,”Pottorff said. “Well I had to personally experience the extreme being real.” Isaac is on the mend and expected to make a full recovery, but that day still gives those involved goosebumps.

“The robotic voice came on and said heartbeat restored,” said Gary Arnold, the head of school for Little Rock Christian Academy.

In an ultra-quiet arena in Little Rock Arkansas, that was the reason fans started to cheer

.Link to origional article
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I need an AED but need help with funding Jump to new posts
MI cardiac arrest survivor raises money for more AEDs admin 06/08/2021 5:13 PM
GRAND RAPIDS — Over the past month, a West Michigan man has raised more than $5,000 to place AEDs in every Gazelle Sports location.

Ted Kushion is motivated by a story of his own. On Labor Day 2019, he suffered a cardiac arrest while at home with his family.

"I have no memory of it," Kushion said. "My wife had to do CPR for about 15 minutes and EMS arrived and they continued, but it wasn't until they had an AED hooked up that, after three tries, they were able to get a heartbeat."

Ted Kushion of Grand Rapids poses for a photo wearing a shirt that reads: "For the love of the run." Kushion sold these shirts in February, ultimately raising more than $5,000 toward placing AEDs in retail stores like Gazelle Sports.
An AED, or automated external defibrillator, is a portable device capable of administering electric shocks to achieve a regular heart rhythm.

"It ended up saving my life," Kushion said.

But when he started back at work as a sales representative for Mizuno — a company that supplies sporting equipment to businesses like Gazelle Sports — Kushion lacked motivation.

"I was struggling," he said. "And then I decided I was going to start raising money for these running stores. I wanted to provide AEDs for stores where people meet up outside and run, so they're prepared in case something happens."

Kushion began his fundraiser in 2020, but was interrupted by the pandemic.

"We were able to get a couple AEDs into stores," he said. "But I have a really long history with Gazelle, having worked for them for 13 years, and they really wanted to get this going."

Gazelle donated 80 shirts to the cause, and Kushion began selling them around Valentine's Day, with the goal of purchasing five AEDs and placing them in each Gazelle Sports location — including one in downtown Holland.

The shirts featured a heart logo and the phrase, "For the love of the run." In the first three hours of the fundraiser, they were gone.

"We were blown away by the support," Kushion said. "That was enough for two AEDs. A couple of days later, we had enough money for four of them, and we ended up raising enough for the fifth and beyond."

The team is still working to figure out where to allocate the additional funds. In total, the fundraiser brought in more than $5,000.

"We're so happy about that," Kushion said. "We're still working with buyers to determine where we'll purchase the AEDs from, but the sense of urgency won't hit for another month or so, since people aren't really meeting up to run yet."

Although he's met his first milestone, Kushion is far from done with his fundraising efforts.

"My goal this year is to put 10 AEDs into our running community," he said. "And now, we're halfway there."

— Contact reporter Cassandra Lybrink at cassandra.lybrink@hollandsentinel.com. Follow her on Instagram @BizHolland.



Link to origional story
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I need an AED but need help with funding Jump to new posts
10.1 Million dollar Helmsley Grant for 4,000 Iowa AEDs admin 06/08/2021 5:02 PM
10.1 million dollar grant in Iowa for AEDs - origional story link

Heart attack survivor wants to inspire awareness and education about CPR and AEDs
The Helmsley Charitable Trust has awarded the State of Iowa a $10.1 million grant to provide the state with more than 4,000 AEDs.

Author: Jackie Schmillen
Published: 8:39 AM CST February 25, 2021
Updated: 9:41 AM CST February 25, 2021


IOWA, USA — As the month of February and American Heart Month wrap up, Local 5 is sharing a story of survival that also has an important message of education and being in the right place at the right time.

It was an average day in October when Chad Coburn started to feel some pain in his elbows that eventually grew into something very serious.

“Went to walk out of the kitchen and brace myself on the countertop and fell over backwards,” Chad recalled. "At that point is when my heart stopped. We didn't know at the time I was having a full-blown heart attack.”

Chad's wife, Crystal, and 13-year-old son saw it happen. Because of CPR training at work, Crystal immediately sprung into action calling 9-1-1, handing the phone to her son, and began chest compressions.

“[He] came inside, saw what I looked like and he was like Chad you were dead. There was no doubt about it, you were dead,” Chad said.

Thankfully the deputy had an AED in his vehicle and was able to administer a shock 8 minutes into the heart attack. A few minutes later after a Poweshiek deputy continued CPR Chad's heart started beating.

“The AED was one of those tools that gave me another opportunity at life."

But it wasn't until after becoming a heart attack survivor that Chad learned that his own Poweshiek County deputies didn’t have AED units in their vehicles. This quickly became a passion project for Chad’s family. Through some research they came across the Helmsley Charitable Trust.

Chad's passion has now shifted so the county has adequate funds to support the AED's they now have in their possession.

“That tool just gives someone else another chance at life, you know in a dire situation,” Chad said.

His family continues to stress the importance of education. Make sure to take the time to learn CPR any way that you can, there are even online courses available. And check with your employer to see if they have an AED on site. It could save your life.
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
Pennridge HS band member saved with school AED admin 06/07/2021 7:07 AM
EAST ROCKHILL — Less than two months after Pennridge High School senior Madeline Hoffman went into cardiac arrest during marching band practice, she and her family came to the Oct. 26 Pennridge School Board meeting to thank district staff members for their response.

"These individuals immediately stepped up and into action and saved my life," the trombone player in the band said.

Hoffman, who had no pre-existing health condition, said Sept. 14 started like a normal day with school and work, then band practice, where she collapsed.

Mark Hoffman, Madeline's father and executive director of the Bucks County Intermediate Unit, outlined what happened next.

Rebe Williams, the color guard coordinator, called 911 within seconds; Hilary Czaplicki, assistant marching band director and an English teacher at the high school, did CPR for an extended period; Emily Fila, the athletic trainer for the high school field hockey team, used a portable automated external defibrillator to restore the rhythm to Madeline's heart; field hockey coach Becky Spahr and Fila assisted with the CPR; band director Kevin Feher rode in the ambulance with Madeline and met the family at the hospital where he gave them information about what had happened; and Superintendent David Bolton provided on the scene leadership along with in the following days sifting through all the information about what had happened and providing that information to the medical team, Mark Hoffman said.

Madeline was taken by ambulance to Grand View Hospital, then transported by helicopter to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in Philadelphia, where she remained for three-and-a-half weeks, Lisa Hoffman, Madeline's mother and assistant superintendent in the Quakertown Community School District, said.

When the family talked to members of the medical team there, "everyone of them called her recovery miraculous," and said it was thanks to what the school district staff had done, she said.

"Getting help, calling 911, delivering CPR, administering the AED, were fundamental to her survival and her quick, powerful recovery," Lisa Hoffman said. "In a medical crisis like cardiac arrest, seconds matter and we are so grateful to all of you who stepped up in a second to care for Maddie."

Madeline is getting stronger every day and walked with the marching band during its previous week performance, her mother said.

"This past month has demonstrated for those of you who don't know Maddie, and even more so for those of us who do, her strength to face and overcome life's most serious challenges with poise and grace," Lisa Hoffman said.

"You are amazing," she told her daughter.

Along with thanking those who came to Madeline's aid, the family wants to raise awareness of how important CPR and AEDs are, Lisa Hoffman said.

Madeline has joined Youth Heart Watch, which helps provide AEDs for schools, her mother said.

The family is blessed to have had support from the community, Mark Hoffman said.

"We're just so fortunate that we're here to be able to tell you this story and to advocate not only for Madeline but just to share the wonderful things that have happened and to showcase how wonderful the Pennridge School District is when your family is in a moment of need," he said.

Also on hand for the presentation were Congressman Brian Fitzpatrick, R-1, and Bucks County Commissioner Bob Harvie.

"God bless you for being special amazing compassionate heroes, and if we could only replicate and clone you all and spread you throughout the community, we'd be in good shape," Fitzpatrick told the six people being honored.

Harvie, a former high school social studies teacher, said people who work in education think of their students as their kids.

"This is one of their kids and they responded," he said.

"Thank you for what you did," he told them.

Harvie presented a proclamation from the Bucks County Commissioners to each of the six and Fitzpatrick presented each with a flag flown over the U. S. Capitol and said their names were entered into the Congressional Record, which will be transmitted to the national archives.

EAST ROCKHILL — Less than two months after Pennridge High School senior Madeline Hoffman went into cardiac arrest during marching band practice, she and her family came to the Oct. 26 Pennridge School Board meeting to thank district staff members for their response.

"These individuals immediately stepped up and into action and saved my life," the trombone player in the band said.

Hoffman, who had no pre-existing health condition, said Sept. 14 started like a normal day with school and work, then band practice, where she collapsed.

Mark Hoffman, Madeline's father and executive director of the Bucks County Intermediate Unit, outlined what happened next.

Rebe Williams, the color guard coordinator, called 911 within seconds; Hilary Czaplicki, assistant marching band director and an English teacher at the high school, did CPR for an extended period; Emily Fila, the athletic trainer for the high school field hockey team, used a portable automated external defibrillator to restore the rhythm to Madeline's heart; field hockey coach Becky Spahr and Fila assisted with the CPR; band director Kevin Feher rode in the ambulance with Madeline and met the family at the hospital where he gave them information about what had happened; and Superintendent David Bolton provided on the scene leadership along with in the following days sifting through all the information about what had happened and providing that information to the medical team, Mark Hoffman said.

Madeline was taken by ambulance to Grand View Hospital, then transported by helicopter to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in Philadelphia, where she remained for three-and-a-half weeks, Lisa Hoffman, Madeline's mother and assistant superintendent in the Quakertown Community School District, said.

When the family talked to members of the medical team there, "everyone of them called her recovery miraculous," and said it was thanks to what the school district staff had done, she said.

"Getting help, calling 911, delivering CPR, administering the AED, were fundamental to her survival and her quick, powerful recovery," Lisa Hoffman said. "In a medical crisis like cardiac arrest, seconds matter and we are so grateful to all of you who stepped up in a second to care for Maddie."

Madeline is getting stronger every day and walked with the marching band during its previous week performance, her mother said.

"This past month has demonstrated for those of you who don't know Maddie, and even more so for those of us who do, her strength to face and overcome life's most serious challenges with poise and grace," Lisa Hoffman said.

"You are amazing," she told her daughter.

Along with thanking those who came to Madeline's aid, the family wants to raise awareness of how important CPR and AEDs are, Lisa Hoffman said.

Madeline has joined Youth Heart Watch, which helps provide AEDs for schools, her mother said.

The family is blessed to have had support from the community, Mark Hoffman said.

"We're just so fortunate that we're here to be able to tell you this story and to advocate not only for Madeline but just to share the wonderful things that have happened and to showcase how wonderful the Pennridge School District is when your family is in a moment of need," he said.

Also on hand for the presentation were Congressman Brian Fitzpatrick, R-1, and Bucks County Commissioner Bob Harvie.

"God bless you for being special amazing compassionate heroes, and if we could only replicate and clone you all and spread you throughout the community, we'd be in good shape," Fitzpatrick told the six people being honored.

Harvie, a former high school social studies teacher, said people who work in education think of their students as their kids.

"This is one of their kids and they responded," he said.

"Thank you for what you did," he told them.

Harvie presented a proclamation from the Bucks County Commissioners to each of the six and Fitzpatrick presented each with a flag flown over the U. S. Capitol and said their names were entered into the Congressional Record, which will be transmitted to the national archives.
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School AEDs Jump to new posts
Ms Indiana candidate advocates for school AEDs admin 06/07/2021 7:01 AM
CINCINNATI (WKRC) - A mom's mission to help protect families from losing their children to sudden cardiac arrest is spurring action in Indiana.

And it's leading to safer sidelines for one school.

Everyone has that teacher who changed their lives. For Hannah Stombaugh - that was her elementary school gym teacher: Julie West

“Julie was honestly the coolest gym teacher,” Stombaugh said. “You cannot take it from me. You can take it from anyone who’s been there. She was so lively and she loved what she did and she loved us all.”

Julie's son, Jake, went to the rival school.

That rivalry turned into a bond in 2013 when Jake collapsed during football practice from an enlarged heart.

“I love Julie and I saw the pain it brought her and I can’t even imagine what it was like,” Stombaugh said.

Now Stombaugh's gym class comes in the form of a dance routine for the Miss America pageant.

In 2020, she was crowned Miss South Bend.

“My platform is #HaveAHeart and it originally started with the Play for Jake Foundation,” she said. “What I advocate for AEDs in public schools and awareness of sudden cardiac arrest.”

When the pandemic hit, Hannah began selling masks on her Etsy store.

She sold more than 800 and raised enough money to purchase an AED - or defibrillator, as well as made donations to three heart foundations.

Now, the South Bend School Corporation will add a life-saving device to its largest venue: TCU school field. Milt Lee is the K-12 Athletics Director for SBSC.

“It gives us peace of mind,” Lee said “The location that we’ve selected to put this AED is perfect for quick use and quick access in case we ever need it.

“We teach our student-athletes to have a heart as well That’s exactly what Miss South Bend did and that’s what we teach our student-athletes to do every single day.”

It's a commitment that goes beyond a title.

“I really want to instill that there’s at least one active, up-to-date AED in each school corporation or building within the state of Indiana,” Stombaugh said.

The Miss Indiana pageant takes place from June 16-19 in Zionsville.


Link to WKRC coverage and video
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Law enforcement use of AEDs Jump to new posts
Canadian Law Enforcement AEDs admin 06/07/2021 6:34 AM
OTTAWA — Putnam County 911 has received a $45,152 grant from the J.E. Belch Charitable Trust to purchase 32 new cardiac AED devices to replace and add to the law enforcement cruisers at the Putnam County Sheriff's Office and every police department in the county.

Putnam County first placed AED units in its law enforcement vehicles in 2006. However, the county was not able to place a device in every vehicle at that time. This grant will enable the county to replace the 2006 devices and also add new units to the vehicles that do not have one.

The trust was established from the estate wishes of J. Earl Belch, who was chief executive officer of the Columbus Grove Telephone Co. which was started by his father, Joe Belch.

Canadian Law Enforcement donation for 32 AEDs
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